Roman Sites in Hungary

Early Christian Necropolis

In the 4th century, a remarkable series of decorated tombs were constructed in the cemetery of the Roman provincial town of Sopianae (modern Pécs). These are important both structurally and architecturally, since they were built as underground burial chambers with memorial chapels above the ground. The tombs are important also in artistic terms, since they are richly decorated with murals of outstanding quality dep ...
Founded: 300-400 AD | Location: Pécs, Hungary

Aquincum

Aquincum was an ancient city, situated on the northeastern borders of the Pannonia province within the Roman Empire. The ruins of the city can be found today in Budapest. It is believed that Marcus Aurelius may have written at least part of his book Meditations at Aquincum. It was originally settled by the Eravisci, a Celtic tribe. Aquincum served as a military base (castrum), having been part of the Roman border protect ...
Founded: 41-89 AD | Location: Budapest, Hungary

Aquincum Civil Amphitheatre

Aquincum Civil Amphitheatre is an ancient structure in Budapest, the lesser of two located in Obuda. The other is the Aquincum Military Amphitheatre. It was built between 250 AD and 300 AD. South of the western gate is an inscription of the Greek goddess Nemesis also known as Rhamnousia/Rhamnusia.
Founded: 250-300 AD | Location: Budapest, Hungary

Aquincum Military Amphitheatre

The Aquincum Military Amphitheatre is the greater of two amphitheatres in Budapest, the other being the Aquincum Civil Amphitheatre. It was built around 145, during the reign of emperor Antoninus Pius.
Founded: 145 AD | Location: Budapest, Hungary

Fertorákos Mithraeum

The Fertőrákos Mithraeum is a temple to the Roman god Mithras at Fertőrákos in Hungary. The temple (known as a mithraeum), follows a typical plan of a narthex followed by the shrine proper that consists of a sunken central nave with podium benches on either side. It was discovered by chance by a stonemason called György Malleschitz in 1866 who undertook the initial clearance of the site. It a ...
Founded: 200-300 AD | Location: Gemeinde Mörbisch am See, Hungary

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Medvedgrad

Medvedgrad is a medieval fortified town located on the south slopes of Medvednica mountain, approximately halfway from the Croatian capital Zagreb to the mountain top Sljeme. For defensive purposes it was built on a hill, Mali Plazur, that is a spur of the main ridge of the mountain that overlooks the city. On a clear day the castle can be seen from far away, especially the high main tower. Below the main tower of the castle is Oltar Domovine (Altar of the homeland) which is dedicated to Croatian soldiers killed in the Croatian War of Independence.

In 1242, Mongols invaded Zagreb. The city was destroyed and burned to the ground. This prompted the building of Medvedgrad. Encouraged by Pope Innocent IV, Philip Türje, bishop of Zagreb, built the fortress between 1249 and 1254. It was later owned by bans of Slavonia. Notable Croatian and Hungarian poet and ban of Slavonia Janus Pannonius (Ivan Česmički) died in the Medvedgrad castle on March 27, 1472.

The last Medvedgrad owners and inhabitants was the Gregorijanec family, who gained possession of Medvedgrad in 1562. In 1574, the walls of Medvedgrad were reinforced, but after the 1590 Neulengbach earthquake, the fortress was heavily damaged and ultimately abandoned. It remained in ruins until the late 20th century, when it was partly restored and now offers a panoramic view of the city from an altitude of over 500 meters.