The Fertőrákos Mithraeum is a temple to the Roman god Mithras at Fertőrákos in Hungary. The temple (known as a mithraeum), follows a typical plan of a narthex followed by the shrine proper that consists of a sunken central nave with podium benches on either side.

It was discovered by chance by a stonemason called György Malleschitz in 1866 who undertook the initial clearance of the site. It attracted a great deal of interest from local scholars and a restoration of the stone vault of the shrine was funded by a local magistrate (the first attempt at reconstruction at any archaeological site in Hungary). This roof, however, was later demolished and the present cover building erected in the 1990s following the excavations of 1990–1991. The mithraeum is currently open to the public.

Two altars refer to people from Carnuntum and they seem to have been the impetus behind the construction of the temple. Its construction can roughly be dated to the beginning of the 3rd century AD. Trapeziodal in shape as the north end is wider than the south (5.50 m wide compared to 3.65 m), the shrine is 5.50 m long. It is orientated north to south, with the southern and eastern sides of the shrine both hollowed out of the natural rock and the northern and western sides being built in stone. Four steps lead down into the central aisle (nave) of the shrine which was 80 cm below the level of the pronaos and the two flanking side benches which were all on ground level. The tauroctony sculpture was carved into the rock face. Three altars were also found on the site. Two were dedicated by Septimius Justianus, a custodes armorum (an soldier in charge of the armoury) of Legio XIIII Gemina. The second was dedicated by Julius Saturninus, a politician from the colony.

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Founded: 200-300 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Pisti “3.14stike” Tóth (14 months ago)
Unfortunately, it was closed due to the virus hysteria.
István Prisztai (16 months ago)
Free to visit Roman remains in cultured conditions. 5 minute program, but worth getting into.
Pecsenka Vince (16 months ago)
It's like an economic recovery ... no one has seen. It is a pity that it is closed due to the pandemic, but the biggest mistake is that no official site provides information about it anywhere.
Tamas Antal (17 months ago)
Nice was just closed and nowhere is an info about the opening hours :)
hanli wen (2 years ago)
closed. don't know when will be opened.
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