Gomirje Monastery

Vrbovsko, Croatia

Gomirje is the westernmost Serb Orthodox monastery in Croatia. It was built in the period of the first larger Serb settling in the villages of Gomirje, Vrbovsko and Moravice at the end of 16th and the beginning of the 17th century. The monastery is thought to have been founded in 1600. The monastery includes the church of Roždenije saint John the Baptist, built in 1719. In 1789, the monastery was devastated by fires and subsequently rebuilt in 1791.

During World War I, Austria-Hungary turned Gomirje Monastery into concentration camp for Serbian Orthodox priests from the Triune Kingdom and areas of Vojvodina. During the World War II, the Ustaše government of the Independent State of Croatia killed monastery monks and took all of the monastery's valuable possessions to Zagreb, while the complex itself was burned in 1943. The monastery was reopened in 1967.

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Address

D42, Vrbovsko, Croatia
See all sites in Vrbovsko

Details

Founded: c. 1600
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Slobodan Aleksic (2 months ago)
The sanctuary of our lady Nice atmosphere Good people Nature is wonderful
Boško Rilak (8 months ago)
The spiritual tranquility of the mountain nature and the hospitality of Father Mihajlo are all great
Александр Ф (10 months ago)
Wonderful Orthodox monastery, the most western in Europe
Jadranka Spehar (13 months ago)
Well, like any other monastery
Fabrizio Lucchese (19 months ago)
Serbian Orthodox Monastery a few miles from the highway, I wanted to visit it out of curiosity after reading something about the monastery, in fact you can't get there by chance since it is located outside the normal main roads. Very simple compared to others I visited, but pleasant. Very kind the young Religious who, after some exchange of information in English, offered to let us also visit the inside where some icons are really interesting.
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