Gomirje Monastery

Vrbovsko, Croatia

Gomirje is the westernmost Serb Orthodox monastery in Croatia. It was built in the period of the first larger Serb settling in the villages of Gomirje, Vrbovsko and Moravice at the end of 16th and the beginning of the 17th century. The monastery is thought to have been founded in 1600. The monastery includes the church of Roždenije saint John the Baptist, built in 1719. In 1789, the monastery was devastated by fires and subsequently rebuilt in 1791.

During World War I, Austria-Hungary turned Gomirje Monastery into concentration camp for Serbian Orthodox priests from the Triune Kingdom and areas of Vojvodina. During the World War II, the Ustaše government of the Independent State of Croatia killed monastery monks and took all of the monastery's valuable possessions to Zagreb, while the complex itself was burned in 1943. The monastery was reopened in 1967.

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Address

D42, Vrbovsko, Croatia
See all sites in Vrbovsko

Details

Founded: c. 1600
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zoran Radocaj (6 months ago)
The westernmost Serbian monastery
diana živković (8 months ago)
Beautiful monastery, very well maintained, neat lawn, and the view that stretches into the distance is unsurpassed. Thanks to the priest who opened the door for us to look inside this beautiful building.
ana anđelka herman (9 months ago)
Worth to see ..... beautiful old monastery ...
Liliya Kuksova (2 years ago)
Orthodox nunnery with a very rich history
Ivan Švorc (2 years ago)
Idyllic location. Calm and just one smooth black cat.
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