Otočec Castle is a castle hotel on a small island in the middle of the Krka River. It is the only water castle in Slovenia and one of the most picturesque images in the country and is a prominent cultural and natural monument.

The castle was first mentioned in documents in the 13th century, although the walls are said to date to the more precise date of 1252. It was once owned by Ivan Lenković, the chief commander of the Croatia-Slavonia march.

Over the centuries that followed the castle underwent architectural and ownership changes, passing from one noble family to another.

Medieval structure of the castle has changed in time, yet some of the architectural details were preserved and cannot be missed out on. One of the most important ones is the Renaissance portal dating back to the 16th century decorated with two marble medallions bearing maiden profiles.

At the beginning of World War II the castle was seized by the Italians and used as a fortress. In 1942, it was burnt by the Partisans and only ruins remained of the two bridges. Castle’s restoration began in 1952 with the restoration of the roof and lasted for six years, also with the help of international work brigades. In 1959, the first restaurant was opened in the restored castle. Over the next few decades the castle changed its appearance until it was restored to its original Gothic and Renaissance splendour as it houses one of the most outstanding hotels in Slovenia.

 

 

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ana Simović Rustja (2 years ago)
Perfect for Sunday, relaxing walk
Bezgovsek (2 years ago)
Beautiful place with lot to see!!!
Дмитрий Копытов (2 years ago)
Extremely satisfying experience. We got the romantic package and had a blast at the 5-course dinner. Staff utterly professional. The place is really magical and is worth a stay for a special occasion. The only comments we have is that we would have appreciated a bottle of water in our room and the breakfast in the terrace.
Bojan Košič (2 years ago)
Nature, castle, river Krka, pleasant nature ambient. Great place to visit!
Alex Zeres (3 years ago)
If you are lucky you can enjoy a splendid sunset from the bridge nearby the castle. A very fine arhitecture. Good food, nice people. A very relaxing walking street near the hotel.
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