An old fortification of the Frankopans, built during the wars against the Turks, Slovin was first mentioned in the 12th century. The old fort was property of the Frankopan family since the 15th century, joined by an old Franciscan monastery from the same period. Later, this town has been called Slunj. In the 16th century the town was ravaged by the Ottoman wars and turned into a military outpost of the Croatian Military Frontier, but by the end of the 17th century the settlement was rebuilt into the Slunj as it exists today. The castle has been developed to a fortress and served as headquarters for the commanding general of this area.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wanderer HR (2 months ago)
Ok
Robert Patruna (4 months ago)
Nice and old ruin! Slunj (Hungarian Szluin, old German Sluin, Latin Slovin, archaic Croatian Slovin grad) is a town in the mountainous part of Central Croatia, located along the important North-South route to the Adriatic Sea between Karlovac and Plitvice Lakes National Park, on the meeting of the rivers Korana and Slunjčica. Slunj has a population of 1,674, with a total of 5,076 people in the municipality (2011)[1] and is the cultural and social center of the region of Kordun in the vicinity to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Administratively, the town is part of Karlovac County. Slunj is underdeveloped municipality which is statistically classified as the First Category Area of Special State Concern by the Government of Croatia. - wikipedia
Gergely Gubányi (11 months ago)
Marvelous placing and a common kind of castle. All thanks for the brave man who deffended it and the land around it: many valuable seeing has been preserved. Sadly did not had the chance to take a closer look.
Valentina Orehovec (13 months ago)
Present look of fortress Slunj is a result of recent reconstruction and still is a building site. Although it looks like a big ruin and in need of reconstruction much is so far done. On the walls it can be seen a difference in colours, very bright stones are new and darker stones are amount of few walls that were standing before reconstruction. Building was reconstructed in the height of two stories, all the windows are reconstructed. Piles of stones in front of the fortress is building material for further reconstruction. Hope that work will resume and that visitors would have more content( like info tables, reconstructed rooms in the fort with items and history of this important site) and reasons to stop here and visit Slunj.
Llubitza Banic (14 months ago)
This place is simple amazing I felt so good and relax the sound of the water relaxes me while I was drinking coffee and walking , each corner is breath taken. If you are professional photographer you can explore this place for a calendar photo album. Highly recommend it to walk this place
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