An old fortification of the Frankopans, built during the wars against the Turks, Slovin was first mentioned in the 12th century. The old fort was property of the Frankopan family since the 15th century, joined by an old Franciscan monastery from the same period. Later, this town has been called Slunj. In the 16th century the town was ravaged by the Ottoman wars and turned into a military outpost of the Croatian Military Frontier, but by the end of the 17th century the settlement was rebuilt into the Slunj as it exists today. The castle has been developed to a fortress and served as headquarters for the commanding general of this area.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eszter Markó (5 months ago)
Closed to visitors, not because of the corona but because it is uncared for. There is a building next to it on the hill but it has been unfinished for a long time and building material is all around.
Ivana Toplak (9 months ago)
Perfect example of true beauty of nature
Slađan Galušić (9 months ago)
Very nice
Wanderer HR (2 years ago)
Ok
Robert Patruna (2 years ago)
Nice and old ruin! Slunj (Hungarian Szluin, old German Sluin, Latin Slovin, archaic Croatian Slovin grad) is a town in the mountainous part of Central Croatia, located along the important North-South route to the Adriatic Sea between Karlovac and Plitvice Lakes National Park, on the meeting of the rivers Korana and Slunjčica. Slunj has a population of 1,674, with a total of 5,076 people in the municipality (2011)[1] and is the cultural and social center of the region of Kordun in the vicinity to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Administratively, the town is part of Karlovac County. Slunj is underdeveloped municipality which is statistically classified as the First Category Area of Special State Concern by the Government of Croatia. - wikipedia
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