The Dubovac Castle overlooks the Croatian city Karlovac. Its square tower was probably built during the 13th century. In the 15th century, the castle was rebuilt in Renaissance style. The castle had various owners—from Slavonian nobleman family Sudar to famous Croatian counts and dukes Frankopan and Zrinski. From 1671 until 1809, the Dubovac was owned by the Karlovac generals. In 1837, a new owner, Count Laval Nugent, rebuilt the castle in the spirit of romanticism. Dubovac was once again renovated in 1952 in relation to graphics from the end of the 18th century.' There is a photograph of the castle at that site.

The castle was used for several years recently as a hotel, and the damage done to the interior to accommodate rooms is now being repaired. There are museum exhibits and a large model of the countryside. Guide materials indicate that the fortress was built on a hill constructed by the people in order to maximize defenses and views of the surrounding areas.

The castle recently was featured on a commemorative Croatian postage stamp, complete with photograph.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dario Stenc (10 months ago)
Nice small castle and great lookout at the top of the highest tower with view at city of Karlovac.
Luka Kezele (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, awsome view, excellent food in restaurant. Highly recommend
Luka Kezele (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, awsome view, excellent food in restaurant. Highly recommend
Anamaria Kasunić (2 years ago)
The best place in town. Also the best aerial view of the town. There is also a beautiful restaurant in the old castle Dubovac. The food is to die for.
Anamaria Kasunić (2 years ago)
The best place in town. Also the best aerial view of the town. There is also a beautiful restaurant in the old castle Dubovac. The food is to die for.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.