Novigrad Castle

Novigrad, Croatia

Novigrad (literally “New Town”, somewhat of a misnomer), a castle ruin perched on a hill above the town of the same name, also has had a turbulent history. The Romans, and before them, the Liburnians, built forts on the same spot. Some of the walls date from Roman times, but Novigrad has been modernized.

It has several restaurants and cafes right on the water, offering nice views of the harbor. Located 31 km east of Zadar via route 502, Novigrad has been the front line in several conflicts. During dynasty wars (1385-1387) in what is now Croatia, two woman of royalty, Mary, the wife of Croatian-Hungarian King Sigismund Luxemberg, and her mother, Elizabeth, were murdered there. During the Kandian Wars (1645-1669) it was an important point of Venice’s defense against the Turks, who occupied the town during 1646-47. When the Venetians retook the town the castle was substantially destroyed.

During the more recent war of 1991-1995 after the break up of Yugoslavia, the Serbs also held the town for two years. There is another spectacular view of the modern day town and the sea from the ruins, which are accessible from several trails. The easiest to find (again, no signs!) starts from the top of some wide stairs that ascend from the east side of town. Go right at the top of the stairs and then left after about 10 meters. It takes around 10 – 15 minutes to reach the castle.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

www.inyourpocket.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Filip Baumgart (4 months ago)
Great place to have a mini uphill hike and to see amazing landscape of beautiful Novigrad. Not a lot of tourists here.
Bee Best (4 months ago)
Well worth the climb. View is spectacular. Be careful when walking around the site .. It is not monitored or made accessible.
Sebastian Reinfeldt (5 months ago)
Novigrad is worth seeing. lovly small streets and walking paths. Drink iced coffee close to the port.
Robert Janostak (6 months ago)
Worth to clime up ... great view from this place
Piotrek Pere (6 months ago)
Interesting ruins and great views from the top.
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