The Ponts Couverts are a set of three bridges and four towers that make up a defensive work erected in the 13th century on the River Ill in the city of Strasbourg in France. The three bridges cross the four river channels of the River Ill that flow through Strasbourg's historic Petite France quarter. The Ponts Couverts have been classified as a Monument historique since 1928.

Construction of the Ponts Couverts commenced in 1230, and they were opened in 1250. As a defensive mechanism, they were superseded by the Barrage Vauban, just upstream, in 1690, but remained in use as bridges. As built, each of the bridges was covered by a wooden roof that served to protect the defenders who would have been stationed on them in time of war. These roofs were removed in 1784, but name Ponts Couverts (covered bridges) has remained in common use ever since.

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Founded: 1230
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Helena Emilie (4 months ago)
Such a pretty place. A great view overlooking the water ways in the city.
H Katharina (5 months ago)
Best view point to have a look down on Petite France, cathedral in the background. Very close to the Museum of Modern Art gives also a nice view on the other side.
Miassar Miski (7 months ago)
This set of 3 bridges and 4 towers was a part of the city defenses in the 13th century. The bridges used to be covered by wooden roof that was removed later. The Covered Bridges lost their military importance when Vauban Dam was built in the 17th century.
sarah elhouch (11 months ago)
Is good to walk around and see very beautiful area and hear the sound of the water
Bia (2 years ago)
Not covered anymore, but the bridges are lovely, very clean, and they'll provide you with stunning pictures of Strasbourg. Highly recommend a walk by, and a stop for a drink on sunny days at one of the restaurants by the water.
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