Kammerzell House

Strasbourg, France

The Kammerzell House is one of the most famous buildings of Strasbourg and one of the most ornate and well preserved medieval civil housing buildings in late Gothic architecture in the areas formerly belonging to the Holy Roman Empire.

Built in 1427 but twice transformed in 1467 and 1589, the building as it is now historically belongs to the German Renaissance but is stylistically still attached to the Rhineland black and white timber-framed style of civil (as opposed to administrative, clerical or noble) architecture.

It is situated on the Place de la Cathédrale, north-west of the Strasbourg Cathedral, with whose rosy colour it contrasts in a picturesque way when seen from the opposite direction.

The building's inside has been decorated on all floors by lavish frescoes by Alsatian painter Léo Schnug (1878-1933). It now houses a restaurant.

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    Founded: 1427
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    4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Nassia (6 months ago)
    Loved the buildind and the stuff was friendly. But the food is BAD. Highly overpriced, flavourless, cheap ingredients. The only thing that is maybe worth trying if you absolutely have to eat there, is the Sauerkraut.
    Nassia (6 months ago)
    Loved the buildind and the stuff was friendly. But the food is BAD. Highly overpriced, flavourless, cheap ingredients. The only thing that is maybe worth trying if you absolutely have to eat there, is the Sauerkraut.
    Olga Kuznietsova (7 months ago)
    The restaurant is truly bad... The quality of products is bad - the sausage seemed like the cheapest they could find in a supermarket, and the choucroutte was completely flavourless. On top of that, the restaurant had such a pretentious attitude, and nothing to show for that. Do not waste your time in this city coming here!
    Olga Kuznietsova (7 months ago)
    The restaurant is truly bad... The quality of products is bad - the sausage seemed like the cheapest they could find in a supermarket, and the choucroutte was completely flavourless. On top of that, the restaurant had such a pretentious attitude, and nothing to show for that. Do not waste your time in this city coming here!
    Stephen (9 months ago)
    They are refusing tourists to enter the restaurant. When u order a tabel they just say they are fully booked. But the people in front of us which were locals where free to choose a table without even checking their " reservation " I feel very much discriminated. They are not worth my money.
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