The Temple Neuf in Strasbourg is a Lutheran church built on the site of the famous Dominican convent where Meister Eckhart studied. The Temple was constructed at the end of the 19th century after the old Dominican Church was destroyed during the Siege of Strasbourg on the night of 24 to 25 August, during the Franco-Prussian War. The ensuing fire also destroyed the libraries of the University of Strasbourg and the City of Strasbourg which were located at the Temple Neuf site.

The Dominican convent had been built in 1260 and in 1538 the Jean Sturm Gymnasium was attached. When Strasbourg became Protestant in 1590, the library of the Protestant seminary was transferred to the convent building.

The current church building was built from 1874 to 1877 in pink sandstone and a Neo-Romanesque style. The architect was Emile Salomon. The name 'Temple Neuf' is a translation of the German name 'Neue Kirche' that the former Dominican Church had carried since 1681, when, with the annexation of Strasbourg by Louis XIV of France, the Protestants had to leave Strasbourg Cathedral.

The Church contains the tombstone of Johannes Tauler, the famous Dominicain mystic and preacher.

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Founded: 1874-1877
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Daniel The determined German (5 months ago)
Free Music! Good acoustics, good seating, good crowed (as in clutured and attentive), nice venue. Worth comig too... I personally come for the Music
Miassar Miski (5 months ago)
On the site of a Dominican church that was destroyed in the Franco-Prussian War in 1870, This Lutheran Romanesque style church was built and acquired the name of the "New Church"
Jpls9 Sk8 (6 months ago)
beautiful
Christo Habib (9 months ago)
Beautiful and very big church in a busy street in Strasbourg. Very peaceful inside it.
Sa W (2 years ago)
Closed all the time, nothing to see here
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