Albi Cathedral

Albi, France

Albi Cathedral is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Albi a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It was built as a fortress in the aftermath of the Albigensian Crusade. Begun in 1287 and under construction for 200 years, it is claimed to be the largest brick building in the world.

The present cathedral was preceded by other buildings. The first dated from the fourth century and in 666 was destroyed by fire. The second is recorded in 920 by the name of Saint Cecilia, the present-day patroness of musicians. It was replaced in the thirteenth century by a Romanesque cathedral in stone.

The Brick Gothic cathedral was constructed in brick between 1287 and 1480 in the wake of the Cathar Church, a Christian non-trinitarian dualist movement with an episcopal see at Albi around 1165 AD. Pope Innocent III initiated a brutal crusade (1209–1229) to extinguish Catharism in southern France, with great loss of life to area residents. In the aftermath of the bloodshed, the cathedral's dominant presence and fortress-like exterior were intended to convey the power and authority of the trinitarian Roman Catholic Church. The instigator of the cathedral's construction was Bernard de Castanet, Roman Catholic Bishop of Albi and Inquisitor of Languedoc. Work on the nave was completed about 1330.

The cathedral is built in the Southern Gothic Style. As suitable building stone is not found locally, the structure is built almost entirely of brick. Notable architectural features include the bell-tower (added in 1492), which stands 78 metres tall, and the doorway by Dominique de Florence (added circa 1392). The nave is the widest Gothic example in France at 18m. The interior lacks aisles which are replaced by rows of small chapels between brick internal buttresses, making Albi a hall church. Compared with regular Gothic, the buttreses are almost entirely submerged in the mass of the church. The principal entry is on the south side through an elaborate porch entered by a fortified stair, rather than through the west front, as is traditional in France.

The elaborate interior stands in stark contrast to the cathedral's military exterior. The central choir, reserved for members of the religious order, is surrounded by a roodscreen with detailed filigree stone work and a group of polychrome statues. Below the organ, a fresco of the Last Judgement, attributed to unknown Flemish painters, originally covered nearly 200 m² (the central area was later removed). The frescoes on the enormous vaulted ceiling comprise the largest and oldest ensemble of Italian Renaissance painting in France.

The cathedral organ, the work of Christophe Moucherel, dates from the 18th century.

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Details

Founded: 1287-1480
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dirk Lubrich (3 years ago)
A wonderful church, impressive building and also the surroundings are lovely, try to visit it in a warm summer evening.
Marianna (3 years ago)
This place is amazing, the cathedral is beautiful. The entrance is free but it is a pity that you have to pay a lot if you would like to see the whole church. But the whole city is fantastic as well, we really enjoyed our time in Albi, highly recommended for everyone to visit it who is around this area in France.
Frank Goodall (3 years ago)
We were well pleased. We made a very long detour to see this and weren't disappointed a beautiful cathedral and stayed over night in a very nice hotel situated next the bridge with spectacular views.
Jamie Hay (4 years ago)
Wonderful and imposing cathedral. Quite a different exterior, being made of brick. Lots to see inside. Relics of saints, amazing and at times horrifying artwork on the walls. Well worth a look.
Andrew Shepherd (4 years ago)
Austere brick exterior does not prepare you for the inside, which is really impressive. Admission free but if you want to see the most interesting part, the Choir, you will have to pay 5 Euros for admission and an audio guide. Lots of other fascinating places to wander around in Albi as well.
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