Palais de la Berbie

Albi, France

The Musée Toulouse-Lautrec is an art museum in Albi. It is dedicated mainly to the work of the painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec who was born near Albi.

The museum opened in 1922 and is located in the historic center of Albi, in the Palais de la Berbie, formerly the Bishops' Palace, an imposing fortress completed at the end of the 13th century. Older than the Palais des Papes in Avignon, the Palais de la Berbie, formerly the Bishops' Palace of Albi, is one of the oldest and best-preserved castles in France.

The museum houses over a thousand works by Toulouse-Lautrec, the largest collection in the world. It is based on a donation by Toulouse-Lautrec's mother after his death in 1901.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Maria (4 years ago)
At first while trying to find the entrance for the garden I found a side alley between the castle and the river good walking spot. You can reach the garden through the first entrance towards the museum, there it parts towards the jardin on the left from the museum entrance around the castle.
Shirra Marina (4 years ago)
It was a breath taking view
Thibault Chaumard (4 years ago)
Beautiful gardens in the city center, offering great views of the river.
Oli L (5 years ago)
Great view of the river. Museum was closed, which was a shame, but its a great place to relax and sse the view.
Barry Pennock (5 years ago)
I was staying in Carcassonne and my son wanted to go because of the giant catfish that prey on pigeons that live in the river there. The first surprise was the cathedral. It is unique, made out of brick and really imposing. Inside it is quite beautiful. Then we walked around the town which has loads of really gorgeous buildings and then we got to the river. Wide and serene with great views of the bridges and the cathedral. This place is an absolute MUST!
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