Church of San Cataldo

Palermo, Italy

Erected in 1154 as a notable example of the Arab-Norman architecture which flourished in Sicily under Norman rule on the island, the Church of San Cataldo is annexed to that of Santa Maria dell'Ammiraglio. In the 19th century it was restored and brought back to a form more similar to the original medieval edifice.

The church has a rectangular plan with blind arches, partially occupied by windows. The ceiling has three characteristics red, bulge domes (cubole) and Arab-style merlons. The church provides a typical example of the Arab-Norman architecture, which is unique to Sicily. The plan of the church shows the predilection of the Normans for simple and severe forms, derived from their military formation. Moreover, the building shows how international the language of Norman architecture was at the time, as the vocabulary which marks parts of the church, like the bell tower, can be tracked down in coeval buildings like the cathedral of Laon and the Abbaye aux Dames in Caen, both in Northern France, or the cathedral of Durham in England. At the same time, the church shows features shared by Islamic and Byzantine architecture, such as the preference for cubic forms, the blind arches which articulate the external walls of the church and the typical spherical red domes on the roof.

The interior has a nave with two aisles. The naked walls are faced by spolia columns with Byzantine style arcades. The pavement is the original one and has a splendid mosaic decoration. Also original is the main altar.

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Details

Founded: 1154
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sven Wischnowsky (17 months ago)
Very nice, small church. Interestingly a mixture of normanic and arabic styles. Take special note of *the* column and find out, what the writing on the capital means.
Agnieszka Diaków (2 years ago)
„San Cataldo was the chapel of a complex of buildings that have disappeared today, belonged to Maione da Bari, Grand Chancellor and later Grand Admiral of the kingdom under King William I (1154-1160).”
Adriana Nad Badovinac dr.med.dent. (2 years ago)
Breathtaking mosaics,paintings and marble sculptures.The visit was very good organized.After seeing Church of St.Catald,the staff directs you what is next to be seen in Norman Palace...don't miss the coffee break in Royal Garden
Igor Zeiger (2 years ago)
Very non standard architecture. The domes and and walls are syncretic between Arabic and Western architecture
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