San Giuseppe dei Teatini Church

Palermo, Italy

San Giuseppe dei Teatini is considered one of the most outstanding examples of the Sicilian Baroque in Palermo.

The church was built at the beginning of the 17th century by Giacomo Besio, a Genoese member of the Theatines order. It has a majestic though simple façade. In the centre niche is housed a statue of San Gaetano, founder of the Theatines order. Another striking feature is the large dome with a blue and yellow majolica covering. The tambour decorated with double columns, and was designed by Giuseppe Mariani. The belfry tower was designed by Paolo Amato.

The interior has a Latin cross plan with a nave and two aisles, divided by marble columns of variable height. The inner decoration is an overwhelming parade of Baroque art, with stuccoes by Paolo Corso and Giuseppe Serpotta. Great frescoes can be seen in the nave, in the vault of the transept: these were painted by Filippo Tancredi, Guglielmo Borremans and Giuseppe Velasquez. The frescoes were severely damaged during World War II, but have been accurately restored. The most important piece of art is however a wood crucifix by Fra' Umile of Petralia.

The crypt houses remains of a former church, dedicated to Madonna of Providence.

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Details

Founded: 1612-1677
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Boscia (2 years ago)
Probably one of the most beautiful churches I have ever visited. I stumbled across it by mistake, then just stood in awe once I got inside.
Kuala Bound (2 years ago)
Started to build in 1612 in elegant magnificent baroque style inspired by Genova churches. It hosts artworks by great artists: Marabitti, Novelli, Serpotta, ecc. I find it more imposing and beautiful than many more famous Rome churches. What i dislike is decoration of large part of the ceilings, mainly in side alleys.
Wanfu Shen (3 years ago)
You will never forget the decoration if you visit here, I promise.
Evaldas Ramanciuškas (3 years ago)
Great fountain ⛲ But it's hot at August
Dominique Burke (3 years ago)
Nice church, donation of €1 per person.
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