Santa Caterina Church

Palermo, Italy

The Church of Saint Catherine (Chiesa di Santa Caterina) is a synthesis of Sicilian Baroque, Rococo and Renaissance styles.

In 1310 the last will of the rich Benvenuta Mastrangelo determined the foundation of a female monastery under the direction of the Dominican Order. The new monastery was dedicated to Saint Catherine of Alexandria and was erected in the area where the old palace of George of Antioch, admiral of Roger II of Sicily, stood.

In 1532 the widening of the building was decided. Between 1566 and 1596 the church was rebuilt under the supervision of the Mother Prioress Maria del Carretto. The church was inaugurated on 24 November 1596.

During the 19th century the church was damaged on several occasions: during the uprising of 1820-1821, the Sicilian revolution of 1848, the Gancia revolt, the insurrection of Palermo (1860) and the Sette e mezzo revolt (1866).

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Details

Founded: 1566-1596
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ghenryeta (5 months ago)
Nice place with beautiful garden. Inside of the church you can find a bakery cafe.
Kadri K (6 months ago)
The church is breathtaking, the monastery is also quite interesting and great views from the rooftop. Well worth a visit!
cynthia go (8 months ago)
Amazing and beautiful structure..I love the church itself and if you go on the roof top, its just breathtaking view.❤❤❤
myung kim (9 months ago)
the best view point and good church. good terras and loop top. friendly worker and good information. inside got good cookies. strongerly recommend.
Antonella AO (12 months ago)
If you go there you must pay to go on the rooftop. The view is beautiful. The service from the staff is a bit weird.
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