Santa Caterina Church

Palermo, Italy

The Church of Saint Catherine (Chiesa di Santa Caterina) is a synthesis of Sicilian Baroque, Rococo and Renaissance styles.

In 1310 the last will of the rich Benvenuta Mastrangelo determined the foundation of a female monastery under the direction of the Dominican Order. The new monastery was dedicated to Saint Catherine of Alexandria and was erected in the area where the old palace of George of Antioch, admiral of Roger II of Sicily, stood.

In 1532 the widening of the building was decided. Between 1566 and 1596 the church was rebuilt under the supervision of the Mother Prioress Maria del Carretto. The church was inaugurated on 24 November 1596.

During the 19th century the church was damaged on several occasions: during the uprising of 1820-1821, the Sicilian revolution of 1848, the Gancia revolt, the insurrection of Palermo (1860) and the Sette e mezzo revolt (1866).

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Founded: 1566-1596
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Marino (8 months ago)
One of the must see in Palermo. Worth the 3 tickets price: Church + Monastery + Roof. Amazing view of Palermo from the roof that is accessed through a peculiar way and stairs. The Cloister is also well kept and it's the perfect spot to enjoy the most delicious pastry tried in Palermo, prepared with the ancient recipes from the nouns who, not long ago, were still living in the Monastery.
Agata Napierała (8 months ago)
For 10 euro you can see everything here. There are also other cheaper options. The rooftop view is amazing. You can buy here tasty pastries and marzipan for a good price.
cecilia giraldi (8 months ago)
Stunning, both the church itself and the rooftops
Rita Sport (8 months ago)
Beautiful view from the top! I recommend going there for sunset and staying until it's dark and enjoy the view at night.
Kuala Bound (11 months ago)
Lovely church built in a way enabling many nuns from the monastery to follow the mass from a superior corridor running around. By the way there is still someone continuing the old tradition of preparing cakes the way the nuns did. What a pity the terrace is open only at weekends.
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