San Matteo al Cassaro Church

Palermo, Italy

The Church of Saint Matthew (San Matteo al Cassaro) was built between 1633 and 1664 by the will of the Miseremini confraternity. The building was probably designed by the architect of the Senate of Palermo, Mariano Smiriglio, but was completed by Gaspare Guercio and Carlo D'Aprile. It is decorated with many works of important Sicilian artists like Vito D'Anna, Pietro Novelli, Giacomo Serpotta, Bartolomeo Sanseverino, Filippo Randazzo, Antonio Manno, Francesco Sozzi. The church is also connected to the palermitan legend of the Beati Paoli.

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Founded: 1633-1664
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

alex vic (2 years ago)
Beautifuf church in tourist street
Claudiu Pojar (2 years ago)
Nice! The one who gave tickets was very idiot. He did not know how to give up money.
Ai-Lin Kuo (2 years ago)
A hidden gem. Centrally located. The paintings inside was a wow. And you get discount price to other churches in Palermo with their ticket, so not a bad deal.
DD K (2 years ago)
A beautiful church in the baroque style, I highly recommend it if you are in the area. Today they had a contemporary art exhibition in the basement of the church - very powerful and haunting.
ta xi (6 years ago)
Whilst small and weathered, the interior was beautifully worn - the ceilings were clad with old paintings and the walls with sculpture. Tucked away on the side of a street, this church was definitely worth a visit.
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