Netum was a considerable ancient town in the south of Sicily. Its current site is at the località of Noto Antica, in the modern comune of Noto.

As a treaty was concluded in 263 BCE between the Romans and King Hieron II of Syracuse, Netum was noticed as one of the cities left in subjection to that monarch. Ptolemy is the last ancient writer that mentions the name; but there is no doubt that it continued to exist throughout the Middle Ages; and under the Norman kings rose to be a place of great importance, and the capital of the southern province of Sicily, to which it gave the name of Val di Noto. But having suffered repeatedly from earthquakes, the inhabitants were induced to emigrate to a site nearer the sea, where they founded the modern city of Noto, in 1703.

The old site is on the summit of a lofty hill about 14 km from the modern town and 20 km from the sea-coast: some remains of the ancient amphitheatre, and of a building called a gymnasium, are still visible, and a Greek inscription, which belongs to the time of Hieron II.

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Founded: 8th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

SABRINA CASAROSA (7 months ago)
New and well-kept structure in a quiet and peaceful area, comfortable and clean room, average breakfast, friendly and helpful staff, attached secure parking, ten minutes walk from the beautiful historic center of Noto. Central location and close to the highway, which allows you to move easily to visit the places of Sicilian Baroque. Recommended.
John Werner (2 years ago)
Excellent new property near the city center. Wonderful staff!
Chris Maxwell (2 years ago)
Stylish hotel, very comfortable, well-laid out rooms, and plenty of parking. The breakfasts were good, the hotel was very quiet, and reception staff extremely helpful - thanks Anna for lending us your own personal umbrella! Minibar prices are very reasonable and there's a decent supermarket just round the corner. It's not in the prettiest location. and you need to be able to walk OK if you want to get to Noto old town, which takes a minimum 10 minutes to get there, hence hesitation between 4 and 5 stars.
Vanessa Morini (3 years ago)
I was treated very poorly This place is not reachable with public transport The person I was travelling with, left for personal reasons and I called my half brother - we don’t look alike - to collect me He regularly registered and the room was payed for two nights The following morning I was candidly asked to make up my mind and check out - in spite of a payed room for the following night - so they could clean up and resell it No manners and no sympathy but a judgemental look All of this for being payed 2 nights instead of 1 Not ideal for foreign women travellers
Peter Lang (3 years ago)
Lovely new hotel in Noto with extremely friendly and helpful staff
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