Netum was a considerable ancient town in the south of Sicily. Its current site is at the località of Noto Antica, in the modern comune of Noto.

As a treaty was concluded in 263 BCE between the Romans and King Hieron II of Syracuse, Netum was noticed as one of the cities left in subjection to that monarch. Ptolemy is the last ancient writer that mentions the name; but there is no doubt that it continued to exist throughout the Middle Ages; and under the Norman kings rose to be a place of great importance, and the capital of the southern province of Sicily, to which it gave the name of Val di Noto. But having suffered repeatedly from earthquakes, the inhabitants were induced to emigrate to a site nearer the sea, where they founded the modern city of Noto, in 1703.

The old site is on the summit of a lofty hill about 14 km from the modern town and 20 km from the sea-coast: some remains of the ancient amphitheatre, and of a building called a gymnasium, are still visible, and a Greek inscription, which belongs to the time of Hieron II.

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Founded: 8th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

SABRINA CASAROSA (2 years ago)
New and well-kept structure in a quiet and peaceful area, comfortable and clean room, average breakfast, friendly and helpful staff, attached secure parking, ten minutes walk from the beautiful historic center of Noto. Central location and close to the highway, which allows you to move easily to visit the places of Sicilian Baroque. Recommended.
John Werner (3 years ago)
Excellent new property near the city center. Wonderful staff!
Chris Maxwell (3 years ago)
Stylish hotel, very comfortable, well-laid out rooms, and plenty of parking. The breakfasts were good, the hotel was very quiet, and reception staff extremely helpful - thanks Anna for lending us your own personal umbrella! Minibar prices are very reasonable and there's a decent supermarket just round the corner. It's not in the prettiest location. and you need to be able to walk OK if you want to get to Noto old town, which takes a minimum 10 minutes to get there, hence hesitation between 4 and 5 stars.
Vanessa Morini (4 years ago)
I was treated very poorly This place is not reachable with public transport The person I was travelling with, left for personal reasons and I called my half brother - we don’t look alike - to collect me He regularly registered and the room was payed for two nights The following morning I was candidly asked to make up my mind and check out - in spite of a payed room for the following night - so they could clean up and resell it No manners and no sympathy but a judgemental look All of this for being payed 2 nights instead of 1 Not ideal for foreign women travellers
Peter Lang (4 years ago)
Lovely new hotel in Noto with extremely friendly and helpful staff
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Arles Amphitheatre

The two-tiered Roman amphitheatre is probably the most prominent tourist attraction in the city of Arles, which thrived in Roman times. Built in 90 AD, the amphitheatre was capable of seating over 20,000 spectators, and was built to provide entertainment in the form of chariot races and bloody hand-to-hand battles. Today, it draws large crowds for bullfighting as well as plays and concerts in summer.

The building measures 136 m in length and 109 m wide, and features 120 arches. It has an oval arena surrounded by terraces, arcades on two levels (60 in all), bleachers, a system of galleries, drainage system in many corridors of access and staircases for a quick exit from the crowd. It was obviously inspired by the Colosseum in Rome (in 72-80), being built slightly later (in 90).

With the fall of the Empire in the 5th century, the amphitheatre became a shelter for the population and was transformed into a fortress with four towers (the southern tower is not restored). The structure encircled more than 200 houses, becoming a real town, with its public square built in the centre of the arena and two chapels, one in the centre of the building, and another one at the base of the west tower.

This new residential role continued until the late 18th century, and in 1825 through the initiative of the writer Prosper Mérimée, the change to national historical monument began. In 1826, expropriation began of the houses built within the building, which ended by 1830 when the first event was organized in the arena - a race of the bulls to celebrate the taking of Algiers.

Arles Amphitheatre is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, together with other Roman buildings of the city, as part of the Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments group.