Colombaia Castle

Trapani, Italy

According to several historical documents, the fortifications in Colombaia island were built first time around the 260 BC, During the first Punic war. The Roman army tried several times to conquer this island, succeeding only in 247 BC, although they left it shortly after and left the territory totally in disuse, with the Castle of the Dovecote which quickly became a nest of doves that would have given way to the pagan worship of the goddess Venus Ericina, who sees his sacred animal in the dove. The arrival of the Arabi in Sicily allowed the Castello della Colombaia to finally find a new function, as it was used as a Lighthouse, being able to illuminate the seas and reactivating one of the most important military buildings until recently.

The arrival of the Aragonese in Sicily it was very important for the Castello della Colombaia, since, seeing its geographical position and the incredible advantages that it could have guaranteed, they decided to completely rebuild this military building, making it decidedly larger and more equipped than the first historical building. The works carried out by the Aragonese are still visible, as it is the same building that has come down to the present day. The Colombaia Castle was also one of the main fortifications during the reign of Charles V, as it allowed to spot and fight any incursions by pirates who intended to attack the Trapani coast. The expansion works also continued in the following centuries, with renovations that continued until the seventeenth century.

Architecture

The Colombaia Castle is tall well 32 meters articulated on 4 floors, each of which was used for particular functions. The entrance was only possible from the second floor, which is why the Colombaia Castle is thought to have been equipped with a drawbridge. The structure is very large and consists of a shape octagonal, inside which there are small streets that connect the various buildings, which include the guard post, two docks, chapels and courtyards.

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Trapani, Italy
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Founded: 1280
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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sicilyintour.com

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paolo Fici (Diamagic) (8 months ago)
Fantastic
Giuseppe Riela (3 years ago)
The Dovecote is one of the symbols of the City of Trapani. 32 meters high according to historical sources, they would like it somehow linked to the Trojan exiles (11th century BC the central nucleus was built around 260 BC by Amilcare Barca during the first war punica in 241 BC war won by the Romana fleet.The famous Rostro that allowed the Roman fleet to win battle of the Egadi, one is exposed to the Pepoli Museum of Trapani. With the victory of the Romans over the Carthaginians, the fortress was abandoned, becoming a huge knot of doves, animals sacred to Venus Ericina.Ricostrued by the Aragonese in the Middle Ages, around 1400 it was strengthened and destined, under the reign of Charles V to. to defend Trapani from Barbareschi pirates. outside, it was the subject of further interventions by the viceroy Claudius Lamoraldo, prince of Ligny.In X1X.secolo the Bourbons la.trasformano in prison and there were imprisoned Sicilian patriots, among them Michele Fardella, baron of Mokarta, who then in 1861 would have become mayor of Trapani. . .
Giuseppe Riela (3 years ago)
The Dovecote is one of the symbols of the City of Trapani. 32 meters high according to historical sources, they would like it somehow linked to the Trojan exiles (11th century BC the central nucleus was built around 260 BC by Amilcare Barca during the first war punica in 241 BC war won by the Romana fleet.The famous Rostro that allowed the Roman fleet to win battle of the Egadi, one is exposed to the Pepoli Museum of Trapani. With the victory of the Romans over the Carthaginians, the fortress was abandoned, becoming a huge knot of doves, animals sacred to Venus Ericina.Ricostrued by the Aragonese in the Middle Ages, around 1400 it was strengthened and destined, under the reign of Charles V to. to defend Trapani from Barbareschi pirates. outside, it was the subject of further interventions by the viceroy Claudius Lamoraldo, prince of Ligny.In X1X.secolo the Bourbons la.trasformano in prison and there were imprisoned Sicilian patriots, among them Michele Fardella, baron of Mokarta, who then in 1861 would have become mayor of Trapani. . .
Marco Pilato (3 years ago)
La Colombaia is one of the cornerstones of the Trapani area. It can be visited during the Colombaia Day, often in spring.
Marco Pilato (3 years ago)
La Colombaia is one of the cornerstones of the Trapani area. It can be visited during the Colombaia Day, often in spring.
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