Basilica of Santa Maria Assunta

Alcamo, Italy

In 1332 the inhabitants of quarter of San Vito moved near the castle of the Counts of Modica, and for this reason a new mother church was built in the same place where the present one is located and it is dedicated to Our Lady of the Assumption. This church opened to worship in 1402, was built in a Catalan-Gothic style with a nave and two side aisles and had a wooden ceiling and side chapels not aligned. It was enlarged and modified in 1471, 1530-1558 and 1581.

Today we can only see the bell tower with double lancet windows (restored in 1942), the chapel of the Holy Thorn and the Baptistery.

The church was rebuilt in 1669 by Giuseppe Diamante and Angelo Italia, while the neo-classical façade was realized in 1786 by Emanuele Cardona.

The garden adjoining the church, since the 15th century, was used as a cemetery for poor people, with an altar where to celebrate Mass during maladies and a stone cross with an aedicula sacred to Our Lady of Mercy. In the 20th century it became a public garden and in 1929 they placed the War Memorial, realized by Bentivegna, a sculptor from Sciacca.

Architecture

The church has a basilican plan with a nave and two side aisles which are divided by two rows of columns with monolithic marble shafts extracted from the near mount Bonifato. The stuccoes were made by the Curtis, while the floor was realized on the architect Giuseppe Patricolo's plan.

The interior contains 38 frescos by Guglielmo Borremans.

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Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Concetta Adragna (15 months ago)
Wonderful frescoes by the Borremans
Giuseppe Di Bona (17 months ago)
Beautiful church with valuable frescoes and bas-reliefs and an adjoining museum
Pramod Kujur (3 years ago)
It is a very beautiful church.
Pramod Kujur (3 years ago)
It is a very beautiful church.
Francesco Labita (3 years ago)
The church is really large and rich in artistic works. The church has a basilical plan with three naves, divided by two rows of columns with monolithic stems of red marble extracted from the nearby Monte Bonifato. The stuccos are the work of the Curti family, while the floor was designed by the architect Giuseppe Patricolo.
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