Mussomeli Castle

Mussomeli, Italy

Mussomeli Castle is a magic and evocative palace where it is possible to enjoy a breathtaking view of the coastline. Built in 1370 by Manfredi Chiaramonte III, this Norman-Gothic castle stands in a strategic position overlooking the whole valley as it is on top of a high limestone crag almost 800 meters above sea level. 

The Mussomeli Castle has not undergone radical changes throughout its history therefore you can get a clear idea of the Sicilian gothic style. The ruins of a great past have been well preserved. The castle was built on 3 levels: the chapel (with the precious alabaster depicting the Madonna della Catena 1516), the aristocratic apartments and an underground. with large halls, dungeons and torture cells. Here you will find the ‘Prison of Death’ where the condemned were kept till they were lowered through a passageway door and drowned.

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Details

Founded: 1370
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.sicily.co.uk

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Pereira (3 months ago)
it was very good ?
Andrea Marino (5 months ago)
Amazing views and really great castle to visit
Andy Green (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to enjoy the day
Andy Green (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to enjoy the day
Donn Smith (3 years ago)
Castle closed early so we enjoyed the view from outside.
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