Archaeological Park of Occhiolà

Grammichele, Italy

On the three ridges of the hill of Terravecchia it is situated the ancient area of Occhiolà, that developed him along an only principal road axle of medieval origin, it notices a great deal simple structures, typical of a country suburb.

On the tall part the imposing castle was found, of which lean traces remain, among which a buttress realized with blocks of square stone. This hilly system that constitutes the greatest part of the territory of Grammichele is an extraordinary archaeological layer that continues to be dug and studied since the first searches of Paul Orsi at the end of last century, and that today you/he/she could become a great cultural park. Here it is found, probably, the ancient Echetla, city sicula then ellenizzata, testimony of the Greek expansion toward the hinterland, of the relationships between natives and Greek.

Necropolis, residences and sacred areas have returned innumerable finds that notice the wealth and the artistic taste of this center.

The earthquake of 1693 completely destroyed Occhiolà and citizens moved to the near Grammichele.

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Grammichele, Italy
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Founded: 5th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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