Basilica della Collegiata

Catania, Italy

The Basilica della Collegiata was built in the early 18th century, after the earthquake of 1693 that had destroyed most of the city.

The design of the church is attributed to Angelo Italia (1628–1700), who changed the orientation of the previous edifice destroyed by the earthquake, in order to have it facing the new via Uzeda (current Etnea Street) according to the rebuilding plan of the city. The façade, designed by the polish architecte Stefano Ittar (1724–1790), is one of the most notable examples of late Baroque in Catania.

It has two orders, the first of which featuring six stone columns, surmounted by a balustrade. The second order has a large central window, with, at the sides, four large statues of St. Peter, St. Paul, St. Agatha and St. Apollonia. Over the second floor is a central element housing the bells.

The church is accessed through a large staircase on which, delimiting the parvise, is a wrought iron parapet.

Interior

The interior follows a common basilica plan, with a nave and two aisles divided by two pilasters, and three apses. The central apse is rather elongated to house the rectory.

The right aisle is home to a baptistery and three altars with canvasses of saints. At the end of the aisles is the Immaculate altar, preceded by a marble balaustrade, over which is a marble statue of the Madonna. In the apse of the nave is the high altar, with an icon of the Virgin with a Child, a copy of a Byzantine original in the sanctuary of Biancavilla. Behind the altar are an 18th-century wooden organ and a wooden choir.

The left aisle, in the apse area, houses the Holy Sacrament Chapel, with a marble altar. The vaults and the dome were frescoed in 1896 by Giuseppe Sciuti with scenes of the Life of Mary, Angels and Saints.

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Address

Via La Piana 6, Catania, Italy
See all sites in Catania

Details

Founded: 1768
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cornel Seiciu (11 months ago)
Such a beatiful church, with delicate decorations and peaceful atmosphere.
Dan M (11 months ago)
Beautiful church in the center of the city Actually we passed by it but were too tired (really hot in August) to stop and get inside. This was a miss I realized after seeing the pictures here. We could have used a break to refill our batteries in the heat of August while enjoying the cool atmosphere inside the church as well as admiring the many pieces of art. Don't make the same mistake as us, and if you happen to be close to this church, take the time to go inside, I believe you won't be disappointed.
Samuel Demian (19 months ago)
beautifull artworks exposed, church still in reconstruction but really nice either way
Tom Hazeldine (19 months ago)
It's free but aside from that nothing remarkable. Worth 10-15 minuites if you happen to be wondering past but not somewhere I'd go out of your way to see. There's all the standard features you'd expect in an Italian basilica but with very minimal frescoes it had little to capture the imagination.
Alan Jinkyu Jang (2 years ago)
There are so beautiful churches in Italy, but the place is quite beautiful and cut size. The basilica sometimes may use a wedding hall that there are some wedding events in a weekend.
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