Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki, Greece

The Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki is one of the largest museums in Greece and the central museum of northern Greece. It holds and interprets artifacts from the Prehistoric, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic and Roman periods, mostly from the city of Thessaloniki but also from the region of Macedonia in general.

The museum is housed in a building designed by architect Patroklos Karantinos and is an example of the modern architectural trends of Greece. Built in 1962, the museum had a new wing added to it in 1980, in which the findings from Vergina were displayed, up until 1997. In 2001 and 2004, in the run-up to the 2004 Athens Olympics, the museum was extensively renovated and its permanent exhibits reorganized.

The central rooms hold exhibits from the archaeological excavations conducted in Thessaloniki and the broader area of Macedonia. The new wing hosts two exhibitions: The Gold of Macedon, with artefacts from the cemeteries of Sindos, Agia Paraskevi, Nea Filadelfia, Makrygialos, Derveni, Lete, Serres, and Evropos; and The Thessaloniki Area in Prehistory, with material from prehistoric settlements, dating from the Neolithic to the Early and Late Bronze Age.

At present, the collection of Archaic to Late Roman sculptures from Thessaloniki and Macedonia in general is displayed in the central section of the museum. They illustrate the history of Thessaloniki from prehistoric times to Late Antiquity. These rooms display architectural members from an Ionic temple of the 6th century BC, sculptures of all periods from Macedonia, exhibits from the excavations in the palace complex built by Galerius in the Thessaloniki city centre, a reconstruction of the façade of the Macedonian tomb in Agia Paraskevi, with genuine architectural members, and finds (mainly gold artefacts) of the Archaic and Classical periods from the Sindos cemetery. In all these rooms, certain important exhibits have been singled out and further information about them is given to help visitors appreciate the importance of each exhibit and of the area and the period from which it comes.

Apart from its permanent displays, the Archaeological Museum also hosts major temporary and thematic exhibitions. 

In the new wing, the Gold of Macedon exhibition includes finds from numerous excavations in Central Macedonia. Taking the history of gold as its central theme, it presents the culture of Macedonia from the 6th century BC to 148 BC, discussing the use of gold (jewellery, sartorial decoration, gilding of objects and vessels, coins), the technology of the manufacture of gold jewellery, and the techniques of gold mining. There are also numerous finds from cemeteries, and their role in burial customs is described.

The Thessaloniki in Prehistory exhibition aims to recreate a picture of the Thermaic Gulf littoral before the city of Thessaloniki was built. It presents the first excavations, which were carried out during the First World War by British and French troops, and finds from the most important prehistoric settlements in the area (Thermi, Vassilika, Stavroupoli, Oraiokastro, Assiros, Toumba, and Kastana) divided into three chronological groups (Neolithic, and Early and Late Bronze Age).

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Details

Founded: 1912
Category: Museums in Greece

More Information

www.amth.gr
en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick (4 months ago)
Nice museum. Modern and fresh. Not too text heavy. Most info is in English as well. Some exhibits and the sculpture are very open and you can get very close to them to take pictures (no flash allowed) so kids would be a knightmare in a place like this unless older and well behaved. If you like to read everything you'll need 3hrs but you can get a good feel of the history in 1.5hrs. €8 entry but if you pay €15 you can get a ticket that allows entry into 6 other historical sites within walking distance for 3days so pretty good value
Dr Dorothy Lobel King (6 months ago)
Fantastic museum very much worth visiting if you’re interested in history. Also has very interesting temporary exhibitions.
Paul (7 months ago)
The Museum has an interesting exhibition around the history of Greece an Thessaloniki. There was also an exhibition about Japan, which felt a bit out of place for me. The staff is friendly, however if the museum is empty one feels a bit odd as they are at least two museum employees in the room. If one is under 25 the entrance is free, otherwise it’s 8€.
Irina kichenina (7 months ago)
Very interesting museum. You need many hours to see the whole collection. Splendid gold collection from funery tombs.
neil crunkhorn (7 months ago)
Fascinating items in the exhibits, brings the imagination to life. Amazing to think people used some of the items 3000 years ago
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