The Roman Forum of Thessaloniki is the ancient Roman-era forum of the city, located at the upper side of Aristotelous Square. It is a large two-terraced forum featuring two-storey stoas, dug up by accident in the 1960s. The forum complex also boasts two Roman baths, one of which has been excavated while the other is buried underneath the city, and a small theater which was also used for gladiatorial games. Although the initial complex was not built in Roman times, it was largely refurbished in the 2nd century. It is believed that the forum and the theater continued to be used until at least the 6th century.

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Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christiee xo (40 days ago)
It's a wonderful site, its unfortunate the area around it has become a late night hanging spot for teenagers that trash the place with trash, cigarette buds and broken glass.
George Kalas (2 months ago)
Inside there is the ONLY one museum of the town's history. Splendid.
Dey Travels (3 months ago)
Large archaeological site. Theatre and seats good condition. Only a few columns still standing. Lots of walls. Many arches in good condition. Wonderful museum in the centre of site underground. Very large plenty of detail information in English.
AndresRafael StefaniSucre (4 months ago)
The Roman Forum of Thessaloniki is the ancient Roman-era forum of the city, located at the upper side of Aristotelous Square. It is a large two-terraced forum featuring two-storey stoas, dug up by accident in the 1960s. The forum complex also boasts two Roman baths,[2] one of which has been excavated while the other is buried underneath the city, and a small theater which was also used for gladiatorial games. Although the initial complex was not built in Roman times, it was largely refurbished in the 2nd century. It is believed that the forum and the theater continued to be used until at least the 6th century
Поліна Юріївна Бондарук (11 months ago)
I strongly recommend everyone in Thessaloniki to visit that part of the city. The main reasons for that are: 1) flee market, which takes the whole street just next to the Rime Forum (i personally dig out silver necklace and earrings in one of the shops) ; 2) The buildings are really LOVELY there and the atmosphere of the neighborhood gives you different perspective on the city of Thessaloniki; 3) The cafes exactly next to the Forum are popular among the locals and you’d be apart with typical tourist stuff as in the city center.
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