Church of Saint Catherine

Thessaloniki, Greece

The Church of Saint Catherine is a late Byzantine church in the northwestern corner of the Ano Poli, Thessaloniki. The church dates to the Palaiologan period, but its exact dating and original dedication are unknown. From its interior decoration, which survives in fragments and is dated to ca. 1315, it has been suggested that it was the katholikon of the Monastery of the Almighty.

It was converted to a mosque by Yakup Pasha in the reign of the Ottoman sultan Bayezid II (r. 1481–1512) and named after him Yakup Pasha Mosque. In 1988, it was included among the Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki on the list of World Heritage Sites by UNESCO.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dimitris V. (11 months ago)
Fragmentary frescoes from the church's original decoration are preserved. Dating back to 13th-14th century AD.
Daniel Fg (2 years ago)
Small byzantine church tucked in-between nondescript apartment buildings. A bit off the main sights in town
Safaa صفاء محمد علي Saedi (3 years ago)
Old church you have to see ...not far from centre city
Sandrien Verloy (4 years ago)
Very beautiful church .. a must see
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