Vlatades Monastery

Thessaloniki, Greece

Vlatades Monastery was founded by the brothers Dorotheus and Markus Vlatadon, who were students of Gregory Palamas, in the latter half of the fourteenth century. It was first mention in a letter by Patriarch Matthew dated in 1400 to Metropolitan Gabriel of Thessalonica.

In 1387, Thessalonica and the monastery were occupied for the first time by the Ottoman Turks. While the monastic community held together, the monastery properties were sequestrated as royal property and the main church was converted into a mosque with the frescoes of its interior plastered cover. During the Turkish occupation a unit of Turkish troops, commanded by a cavus, was billeted at the monastery giving rise to the name Cavus Monastir, still often popularly applied to the monastery.

During the latter part of the sixteenth and most of the seventeenth centuries the condition of the Monastery of Vlatadon and its dependencies deteriorated. While supported by a succession of Patriarchs of Constantinople, the monks of the Monastery of Vlatadon attempted to recover and restructure their dependencies in Thessalonica.

By the mid-twentieth century the monastery became a meeting place for scholars and academics of the city. In 1965, the Patriarchal Institute for Patristic Studies was established that has worked closely with the Aristotelean University of Thessalonica. In recent years the Monastery of the Vlatades has been further renovated and expanded.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rosh R (7 months ago)
Nice monastery from the outside with great views of Thessaloniki from a high point! There are also some peacocks, chickens and some other birds to be seen here which is nice!
S. J. (9 months ago)
Very well kept place, you will find peace in the mix of a crazy world right there on top of the mountain
Savvas Stampolloglou (10 months ago)
Nice monastery from Byzantine times . Offers also a very nice view of the city plus a small garden with animals. It’s also a
Laura Davideanu (11 months ago)
This monastery was a royal grant from Byzantine Empress Anna Palaiogos. On the land where the monastery was built, according to legend, the Apostle Paul preached to the Thessalonians in 51 A.D, during his second mission. This is what the monastery looks like, totally worth visiting.
Gordon Albrecht (11 months ago)
The beauty of the place is deceptive! Here animals are mistreated and put on display. In far too small kennels deer, rabbits, birds, etc. are waiting to be killed and eaten. I’m not sure which god is being worshipped here, but he/she will not like this. Shame on you!
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