Glamis Castle is one of the most impressive, romantic and reputedly haunted castles in Scotland, home to the Bowes Lyon Earls of Strathmore and Kinghorne for hundreds of years and with a splendid interior, and set in beautiful gardens and grounds near Forfar in Angus.

The vicinity of Glamis Castle has prehistoric traces; for example, a noted intricately carved Pictish stone known as the Eassie Stone was found in a creek-bed at the nearby village of Eassie.

In 1034 King Malcolm II was murdered at Glamis, when there was a Royal Hunting Lodge. In William Shakespeare's play Macbeth (1603–1606), the eponymous character resides at Glamis Castle, although the historical King Macbeth (d. 1057) had no connection to the castle.

By 1372 a castle had been built at Glamis, since in that year it was granted by King Robert II to Sir John Lyon, Thane of Glamis, husband of the king's daughter. Glamis has remained in the Lyon (later Bowes-Lyon) family since this time. The castle was rebuilt as an L-plan tower house in the early 15th century.

During the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland, soldiers were garrisoned at Glamis. In 1670 Patrick Lyon, 3rd Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, returned to the castle and found it uninhabitable. Restorations took place until 1689, including the creation of a major Baroque garden. John Lyon, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, succeeded in 1753, and in 1767 he married Mary Eleanor Bowes, heiress to a coal-mining fortune. He set about improving the grounds of the castle in the picturesque style in the 1770s. The south-west wing was rebuilt after a fire in the early 19th century. In the 1920s a huge fireplace from Gibside, the Bowes-Lyon estate near Gateshead, was removed and placed in Glamis' Billiard Room. The fireplace displays the coat of arms of the Blakiston family; Gibside heiress Elizabeth Blakiston had married Sir William Bowes. Several interiors, including the Dining Room, also date from the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 1900, Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon was born, the youngest daughter of Claude Bowes-Lyon, 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne and his wife, Cecilia (née Cavendish-Bentinck). She spent much of her childhood at Glamis, which was used during the First World War as a military hospital. She was particularly instrumental in organising the rescue of the castle's contents during a serious fire on 16 September 1916. On 26 April 1923 she married Prince Albert, Duke of York, second son of King George V, at Westminster Abbey. Their second daughter, Princess Margaret, was born at Glamis Castle in 1930.

Since 1987 an illustration of the castle has featured on the reverse side of ten pound notes issued by the Royal Bank of Scotland. Glamis is currently the home of Simon Bowes-Lyon, 19th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, who succeeded to the earldom in 2016.

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Address

Forfar, United Kingdom
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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jean Clark (4 months ago)
Walked the walks with friends and ate outside on a sunny day - sheer bliss as each section is marked detailing where you are and what it us all about. Food was yummy.
Daniel Rogers (4 months ago)
A wonderful castle set in idyllic grounds with the magnificent Highland coo within the grounds too. The castle really is as impressive as youtube videos and other reviews would lead you to believe. Its very large and in a wonderful state of repair. We toured the grounds etc too and wondered down the Macbeth trail to the Italian and walled gardens. Overall I highly recommend.
Tobias Shotts (5 months ago)
Beautiful castle and the grounds are amazing! Kids loved the garden and the many trees and the adults enjoyed the while experience. Much recommend!!
Rada Ramsay (5 months ago)
Fabulous grounds, good virtual tour of the castle with lots of interesting things to see. Hand gel available at every corner! Not the cheapest day out but very enjoyable.
Gordon cook (5 months ago)
Awesome experience in an excellent and mind blowing place to visit on any occasion. And if you enjoy history you can also enjoy your visit. The sites are quite awesome, the staff were very excellent and helpful and polite, well worth a visit. And i can say that I highly recommend the place to any tourist wanting to the premises.
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