The McManus Art Gallery and Museum is a Gothic Revival-style building, located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland.

The building was designed by the architect George Gilbert Scott, who was an expert for the restoration of mediaeval churches and advocate of the Gothic architectural style. He intended to design a large tower like in his previous work at St. Nikolai, Hamburg. The foundations were situated in a small wetland called Quaw Bog at the confluence of the Scourin Burn and Friar Burn, which has since been drained. This meant that the area under the building site was underpinned by large wood beams. However, when construction began in 1865, the ground proved too unstable to support the larger tower that he envisaged. The building was opened as the Albert Institute in 1867.

Two further sections, which extended the building by four art galleries and four museum galleries, were added by 1889. The central section was designed to Scott's intention by David MacKenzie, with the Eastern Galleries by William Alexander. The contents of the Watt Institute, founded in 1848, were incorporated into the collection before the opening of the civic museum and art gallery in 1873. Between 1873 and 1949, the buildings were administrated as part of public library service. From 1959, the city corporation took over the running of the administration. Ironically, following a later refurbishment the building now commemorates the Lord Provost Maurice McManus. Initially retitled McManus Galleries, after refurbishment in 2010, it is now formally known as The McManus: Dundee's Art Gallery and Museum.

The collection includes three paintings by Thomas Musgrave Joy which celebrate Grace Darling's rescue of passengers on the paddlesteamer Forfarshire.

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Founded: 1867
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Tucker (2 months ago)
This is such a brilliant place with so much to see. It was our first time in Dundee and we would highly recommend it if you want to get an instant feel for this proud city. Special thanks to Amelia who introduced herself at the door (in chilly conditions) then took time to engage with us on one of her 'walk arounds' whilst inside. Her enthusiasm and warmth made our afternoon.
Lizzie (2 months ago)
A great little museum, good variety of exhibitions well curated and a nice art gallery as well. Some lovely prehistoric finds and a good documentation of Dundee's history. Didn't stop for food but the cafe smelled great. Free admission, and a great afternoon out!
Angus McNicoll (3 months ago)
Love the "re-vamped" museum which focuses on Dundee's history. So many memories for me in the photographs and high quality exhibits. Definitely well worth visiting for anyone interested in Dundee and its past. As an added bonus, it's very wheelchair friendly too!
Phil Hair (9 months ago)
Visited the McManus Art Gallery having been to the V & A which was so very disappointing. Quite wonderful - interesting, informative, helpfully set out. If only we'd had more time before catching our train back to Stirling. The McManus is to be commended - and the V & A could learn a lot about how to exhibit!
My name is _ (11 months ago)
Beautiful museum both inside and out. Educational and well organized with a wide variety of Archaeological relics from around Scotland. Enjoyed my visit. There's also a nice cafe inside.
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Royal Palace of Naples

Royal Palace of Naples was one of the four residences near Naples used by the Bourbon Kings during their rule of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (1734-1860): the others were the palaces of Caserta, Capodimonte overlooking Naples, and the third Portici, on the slopes of Vesuvius.

Construction on the present building was begun in the 17th century by the architect Domenico Fontana. Intended to house the King Philip III of Spain on a visit never fulfilled to this part of his kingdom, instead it initially housed the Viceroy Fernando Ruiz de Castro, count of Lemos. By 1616, the facade had been completed, and by 1620, the interior was frescoed by Battistello Caracciolo, Giovanni Balducci, and Belisario Corenzio. The decoration of the Royal Chapel of Assumption was not completed until 1644 by Antonio Picchiatti.

In 1734, with the arrival of Charles III of Spain to Naples, the palace became the royal residence of the Bourbons. On the occasion of his marriage to Maria Amalia of Saxony in 1738, Francesco De Mura and Domenico Antonio Vaccaro helped remodel the interior. Further modernization took place under Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. In 1768, on the occasion of his marriage to Maria Carolina of Austria, under the direction of Ferdinando Fuga, the great hall was rebuilt and the court theater added. During the second half of the 18th century, a 'new wing' was added, which in 1927 became the Vittorio Emanuele III National Library. By the 18th century, the royal residence was moved to Reggia of Caserta, as that inland town was more defensible from naval assault, as well as more distant from the often-rebellious populace of Naples.

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In 1922, it was decided to transfer here the contents of the National Library. The transfer of library collections was made by 1925.

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