The Howff is a burial ground in Dundee. Established in 1564, it has one of the most important collections of tombstones in Scotland. The land of the burial ground was part of the Franciscan (Greyfriars) Monastery until the Scottish Reformation. In 1564 Mary, Queen of Scots granted the land to the burgh of Dundee, for use as a burial ground. It was used for meetings by the Dundee Incorporated Trades. Old parish records for burials within The Howff begin in the late 18th century. Prior to this records of mortcloth hire, a cloth rented out by the Guildry and Trades to cover bodies or coffins before burial, provide evidence of burials dating back to 1655. Meetings at The Howff ceased in 1776. The last burial took place in 1878 (George Duncan). The walls along the west side date from 1601.

The vault to the extreme south west (now simply saying 'Blackness' inside) was the burial Vault of the Wedderburns of Blackness House in Dundee. A sealed window on its exterior appear to indicate this was either a watch-house or part of the original meeting-house prior to the vault being built (c.1630).

The graveyard is highly unusual by Scottish standards, containing a high number of Roman-style coffer tombs. It also contains a high number of inscriptions which philosophise on death itself rather than discussing the person interred.

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User Reviews

Spectrum (2 months ago)
Good place to hide Madeline macan The cops will have no clue
Ribby Ribmeister07 (4 months ago)
It was really good to kill my aunt and berry her in the empty graves
Maya M (5 months ago)
Unique, historic and beautiful cemetery. Lots of amazing grave stones.
Nancy Ledgerwood (12 months ago)
It’s a wonderful experience wandering through.
William Stuart (2 years ago)
Situated in the centre of Dundee, this beautiful old cemetery is worth a visit to see the beautiful carvings on the headstones, some of the carvings represents what they worked at when they were alive.
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