The Howff is a burial ground in Dundee. Established in 1564, it has one of the most important collections of tombstones in Scotland. The land of the burial ground was part of the Franciscan (Greyfriars) Monastery until the Scottish Reformation. In 1564 Mary, Queen of Scots granted the land to the burgh of Dundee, for use as a burial ground. It was used for meetings by the Dundee Incorporated Trades. Old parish records for burials within The Howff begin in the late 18th century. Prior to this records of mortcloth hire, a cloth rented out by the Guildry and Trades to cover bodies or coffins before burial, provide evidence of burials dating back to 1655. Meetings at The Howff ceased in 1776. The last burial took place in 1878 (George Duncan). The walls along the west side date from 1601.

The vault to the extreme south west (now simply saying 'Blackness' inside) was the burial Vault of the Wedderburns of Blackness House in Dundee. A sealed window on its exterior appear to indicate this was either a watch-house or part of the original meeting-house prior to the vault being built (c.1630).

The graveyard is highly unusual by Scottish standards, containing a high number of Roman-style coffer tombs. It also contains a high number of inscriptions which philosophise on death itself rather than discussing the person interred.

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Simon nicholson (17 months ago)
An interesting look back in time of the people and families of Dundee. A well looked after graveyard, and worth a look.
Spectrum (2 years ago)
Good place to hide Madeline macan The cops will have no clue
Spectrum vr (2 years ago)
Good place to hide Madeline macan The cops will have no clue ?
Ribby Ribmeister07 (2 years ago)
It was really good to kill my aunt and berry her in the empty graves
Ribby Ribmeister07 (2 years ago)
It was really good to kill my aunt and berry her in the empty graves
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