Aberlemno Sculptured Stones

Aberlemno, United Kingdom

The Aberlemno Sculptured Stones are a series of five Class I and II Early Medieval standing stones found in and around the village of Aberlemno. The stones with Pictish carvings variously date between about AD 500 and 800.

Aberlemno 1, 3 and 5 are located in recesses in the dry stone wall at the side of the road in Aberlemno. Aberlemno 2 is found in the Kirkyard, 300 yards south of the roadside stones. In recent years, bids have been made to move the stones to an indoor location to protect them from weathering, but this has met with local resistance and the stones are currently covered in the winter.

Aberlemno 4, the Flemington Farm Stone was found 30 yards from the church, and is now on display in the McManus Galleries, Dundee.

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Aberlemno, United Kingdom
See all sites in Aberlemno

Details

Founded: 500-800 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva Hines (17 days ago)
Very cool quick stop, not sure if it’s worth going out of your way to see it, but definitely a cool site!
Lee Maden (19 days ago)
Beautiful stones very little else around to see
Stephen Deacon (50 days ago)
Fascinating part of Scottish history. Well worth a small detour. I must add that we impressed with a good sized car park and immaculate toilet facilities.
jackie lawrence (2 months ago)
I am sure these are wonderful but on 2nd April they were still encased in wooden boxes so you could see nothing. Why not used perspex very disappointing aswe are unlikely to be back
Cameron Morrison (8 months ago)
These stones are about the best you will see on public display and in their natural setting in Scotland.
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