Holy Trinity Church

St Andrews, United Kingdom

The Category A listed Holy Trinity is the most historic church in St Andrews. The church was initially built on land, close to the south-east gable of the Cathedral, around 1144, and was dedicated in 1234 by Bishop David de Bernham. It then moved to a new site on the north side of South Street between 1410–1412 by bishop Warlock. Much of the architecture feature of the church was lost in the re-building by Robert Balfour between 1798–1800. The church was later restored to a (more elaborately decorated) approximation of its medieval appearance between 1907–1909 by MacGregor Chambers.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Gilbey (2 years ago)
Don’t live near this place. They ring the bells every fifteen minutes from 3am to midnight.
Helen “Nannabear” Green (2 years ago)
Stunning building. Ramps were available for wheelchair users.
Gemma Stoddart (2 years ago)
I got married here in the holy trinity church Also we had a baptism here lovely church
David Brown (3 years ago)
This is a beautiful peaceful place
James Waters (5 years ago)
Lovely church but also always a lot going on for everyone - exhibitions, events, etc
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