The Category A listed Holy Trinity is the most historic church in St Andrews. The church was initially built on land, close to the south-east gable of the Cathedral, around 1144, and was dedicated in 1234 by Bishop David de Bernham. It then moved to a new site on the north side of South Street between 1410–1412 by bishop Warlock. Much of the architecture feature of the church was lost in the re-building by Robert Balfour between 1798–1800. The church was later restored to a (more elaborately decorated) approximation of its medieval appearance between 1907–1909 by MacGregor Chambers.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Gilbey (8 months ago)
Don’t live near this place. They ring the bells every fifteen minutes from 3am to midnight.
Helen “Nannabear” Green (10 months ago)
Stunning building. Ramps were available for wheelchair users.
Gemma Stoddart (12 months ago)
I got married here in the holy trinity church Also we had a baptism here lovely church
David Brown (2 years ago)
This is a beautiful peaceful place
James Waters (4 years ago)
Lovely church but also always a lot going on for everyone - exhibitions, events, etc
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The Aberlemno Sculptured Stones are a series of five Class I and II Early Medieval standing stones found in and around the village of Aberlemno. The stones with Pictish carvings variously date between about AD 500 and 800.

Aberlemno 1, 3 and 5 are located in recesses in the dry stone wall at the side of the road in Aberlemno. Aberlemno 2 is found in the Kirkyard, 300 yards south of the roadside stones. In recent years, bids have been made to move the stones to an indoor location to protect them from weathering, but this has met with local resistance and the stones are currently covered in the winter.

Aberlemno 4, the Flemington Farm Stone was found 30 yards from the church, and is now on display in the McManus Galleries, Dundee.