Carlungie Earth House

Dundee, United Kingdom

At about 40m long, Carlungie Earth House is one of the largest and most complex examples of its kind in Scotland. It was accidentally discovered during ploughing in 1949. Subsequent excavations during the following two years also revealed about eight associated stone dwellings at ground level.

Earth houses, or souterrains as they are also known, were not dwellings, but stone-lined underground passages which typically date to the Iron Age. They’re found along much of eastern Scotland, as well as in Ireland, Cornwall and Brittany.

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Founded: 50 BCE - 450 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ian Whittaker (10 months ago)
Follow the sign to Carlungie and then you'll see the small sign by the side of the road and a gateway leading 50 m or so across a field to these remains. When we visited (September 2021) the surrounding field was planted with Brussels Sprouts so you would get very wet legs walking across the field if it has been recently raining! Something I've never seen before, but you do need to be a bit of a fan of archaeology to find it a riveting visit. Having said that it was worth the hunt.
Iain Hunter (15 months ago)
first time seen the sign for it. It was interesting
pam imrie (15 months ago)
Amazing to have these historical gems on our doorstep.
Andrew Lawson (2 years ago)
A bit of a hole in the ground and various bit of stone works shows that someone, at some point had a building there. Pretty pointless. Info board and small parking. Not really worth a visit.
Andy Lawson (2 years ago)
A bit of a hole in the ground and various bit of stone works shows that someone, at some point had a building there. Pretty pointless. Info board and small parking. Not really worth a visit.
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