Strzelce Opolskie Castle

Strzelce Opolskie, Poland

Strzelce Opolskie Castle was a former residence of the Dukes of Opole located in Strzelce Opolskie. The castle was burned down during World War II by the Soviets and remains in ruins to this day.

The town of Strzelce Opolskie was situated on the trade route Kraków–Wrocław–Dresden. The settlement was initially surrounded by a thick forest. An original wooden hunting lodge was probably replaced by a stone structure in the 13th century. The castle was first mentioned in Liber fundationis episcopatus Vratislaviensis as Castrum Strelecense. The document is believed to be compiled in 1305.

The castle was built on a simple rectangular plan measuring 16,1 x 13,9 m and was, in fact, a limestone tower. In 1323 Albert became the duke of an independent Duchy of Strzelce/Strehlitz. He carried out extensive renovations to the castle and built a series of fortifications and a moat around it. After his death the castle and the duchy was taken over by the Piasts of Niemodlin and after the extinction of the line in 1382 it was passed to the Piasts of Opole. The dynasty owned the castle up to its extinction in 1532.

In the first half of the 16th century the castle was in very poor condition. From 1562 to 1596 major renovation works were carried out. From the middle of the 17th century to the beginning of the 19th century it was in hands of the Colonna family. The castle's heyday came after 1815 when Andreas Renard took its ownership and made it his main residence. An English-style landscape park was created in 1832. In 1840 Andreas Renard extended and remodelled the palace adding an adjacent tower and building horse stables near the west wing.

From 1932 to 1945 the palace was possessed by the Castell family. On 21 January 1945 Soviet troops set the town and castle on fire. The building remains in ruins to this day.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex K (11 months ago)
Nice park. The visible ruins are not quite the ruins of the Piast castle, the Piast line died out, they died and the castle was in ruins. Somehow in 1562 the new dukes rebuilt it, adding new parts over time.
Zbysk K (15 months ago)
The stars are when judging the ruins. Because the ruins are large ... Well, there are no three stars to get to their interior. Because as for the ruins, you could give 5 stars. The ruins can be walked outside ... here you can walk to a nicely rebuilt tower. As for the ruins themselves. There was a time that I lived next to them - not long, for 4 months in 1981 - but still. Although I did not have much time, I visited these ruins a bit. Back then, there was access to the ruins inside - but there was nothing interesting inside - I only remember that there were tiles on the fragments of the wall ... maybe two of them. And the whole thing looked like everything had been looted, even from the walls. Maybe I am wrong, but I think that the ruins were smaller then, ie it seems to me that many have been rebuilt since then .. As for the Tower, I do not remember if it was. The ruins are two steps away from the Town Hall, it is worth walking around them and the park behind them is impressive - almost unheard of in terms of size in the city centers.
Sebo 1976 (15 months ago)
A place worth seeing, near the ruins, a nice park, a good place for a moment of rest
Krzysztof K (15 months ago)
Let's be honest about this castle, no one will ever rebuild it, like Kopic. The cost of this would be greater than building a new one. There are practically the same thick outer walls, everything else was burned by the Red Army, and what was probably stolen or destroyed. Only the tower was rebuilt. He does not go to the ruins. Watching practically for three minutes. Good thing right next to the ruins is a large English-style park with interesting specimens of trees where you can come.
Ania B (17 months ago)
The beautiful Strzelecki Park, it is a pity that the ruins of the castle have not been renovated, beautiful in my opinion, that it would be a museum. You just have to wait for the reconstruction
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