The Linlithgow Palace was one of the principal residences of the monarchs of Scotland in the 15th and 16th centuries. Although maintained after Scotland's monarchs left for England in 1603, the palace was little used, and was burned out in 1746. It is now a visitor attraction in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

A royal manor existed on the site in the 12th century. This was replaced by a fortification known as 'the Peel', built in the 14th century by occupying English forces under Edward I. The site of the manor made it an ideal military base for securing the supply routes between Edinburgh Castle and Stirling Castle. The English fort was begun in March 1302 under the supervision of two priests, Richard de Wynepol and Henry de Graundeston.

In 1424, the town of Linlithgow was partially destroyed in a great fire. King James I started the rebuilding of the Palace as a grand residence for Scottish royalty, also beginning the rebuilding of the Church of St Michael immediately to the south of the palace. Over the following century the palace developed into a formal courtyard structure, with significant additions by James III and James IV. James V was born in the palace in April 1512. James V added the outer gateway and the elaborate courtyard fountain. The stonework of the South fa├žade was renewed and unified for James V in the 1530s.

The Duke of Cumberland's army destroyed most of the palace buildings by burning in January 1746. The palace has been actively conserved since the early 19th century. The site is open to visitors all year round. In summer the adjacent 15th-century parish church of St Michael is open for visitors, allowing a combined visit to two of Scotland's finest surviving medieval buildings.

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Founded: 1302
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Ray Ramjan (12 months ago)
Very interesting history. Although, it's more like a ruin now but the surrounding area is just wonderful.
Shinara Hussain (12 months ago)
Beautiful and serene. Was a gorgeous day, and the loch looked especially peaceful.
June Getty (12 months ago)
Even on a grey day and the palace closed the walk round the lake and the view of the palace is worth a trip to Linlithgow we love it
J C (Technical Trader) (12 months ago)
Here most days cycling a beautiful place to stop and have a coffee
Ian Dawson (12 months ago)
A part of Scotland's history that every Scot should visit...
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