Château de Beauregard

Cellettes, France

The Château de Beauregard is a Renaissance castle located on the territory of the commune of Cellettes. Most of the château was built around 1545, when it was bought by Jean du Thiers, Lord of Menars, and Secretary of State to Henri II. The commissioned interior included frescoes on the fireplace of the royal chamber, which have survived. In the Great Gallery there is a fireplace in Italian style from this period. However its main feature was commissioned by Paul Ardier, Comptroller of Wars and Treasurer, who bought the château in 1617. He added further interior decorations over the next few decades, including a gallery of portraits.

The castle is renowned for its Gallery of portraits decorated in the 17th century with 327 portraits of famous people. The gallery, the largest in Europe to have survived to our days, is the masterpiece of the castle: built during the first half of the 17th century at the request of Paul Ardier, it is 26 meters long, its pavement is entirely made of 5 500 Delftware tiles and its walls are decorated with 327 portraits of famous people having lived between 1328 (date of the beginning of the reign of Philippe VI of France) and 1643 (death of Louis XIII).

The French kings are depicted accompanied by portraits of their queens, ministers, marshals, diplomats etc. Apart from French personalities, other important historical people of 25 nationalities are represented. Marie Ardier, daughter of Paul Ardier, committed the decoration of the ceiling to the painter Jean Mosnier and its family. The blue color which dominates has been obtained by the use of lapis lazuli, one of the most precious and expensive mineral stones in the 17th century.

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Details

Founded: 1545
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne-marie Gostling (2 years ago)
Stunning privately owned castle well worth a visit
Debbie Fordham (2 years ago)
The gardens were beautiful and the chateaux was beautiful to well worth going
Jan Luse (2 years ago)
Enjoyed this smaller family chateau, especially the picture gallery of all the rich and famous in the 15-1600's.
craig slota (2 years ago)
The chateau de beauregard is definitely a nice chateau, the problem however is that the chateau is currently inhabited. What this means is that you are limited to seeing only 2 spaces in the chateau, one being a period styled kitchen and a 1/8 section of a single floor. For the price this is pretty much a waste of money. Further if you have bikes, you have to pay to bring those in the gardens - why? I wouldn't recommend this chateau.
Geoffrey AUCKLAND (2 years ago)
There's more History packed in to this lovely little château than you'd have remembered from school. Three centuries of the movers and shakers who formed Europe adorn the walls of the unique portrait gallery. Be sure to take a guided tour at nous extra cost. Allow time for a stroll in the delightful Park.
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