The Castlelaw Hill Fort is the remnant of a stronghold of the Iron Age. When it was occupied the site consisted of three earthwork ramparts, ditches and timber palisades. The fort contained a Souterrain for the storage of agricultural produce. V. Gordon Childe undertook excavations at Castlelaw in 1932–33. The work focused on the rampart, and showed that it consisted of a clay and timber filling, faced by stone.

The fort commands views over the Forth and Lothian. Traprain Law and Berwick Law, both significant centres of power in the Iron Age, are visible from the site.

The fort is maintained by Historic Environment Scotland as a scheduled monument. Access to the site is free but, since the area is an active sheep pasture, dogs should be kept under control. The site also neighbours an army firing range and so care should be taken not to pass into the area marked by red flags.

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Founded: 1000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

(3 years ago)
Fantastic place.
Jordan Clark (4 years ago)
Gid gear.
A11osaurus (4 years ago)
Kasia Maliszewska (4 years ago)
Great walk and views
Robert Richards (5 years ago)
A beautiful spot with excellent views.
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