National Monument of Scotland

Edinburgh, United Kingdom

The National Monument of Scotland, on Calton Hill, is Scotland's national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic Wars. It was intended, according to the inscription, to be 'A Memorial of the Past and Incentive to the Future Heroism of the Men of Scotland'.

The monument dominates the top of Calton Hill, just to the east of Princes Street. It was designed during 1823-6 by Charles Robert Cockerell and William Henry Playfair and is modelled upon the Parthenon in Athens. Construction started in 1826 and, due to the lack of funds, was left unfinished in 1829. Subsequent attempts to 'complete' the National Monument have never borne fruit for reasons of either cost or lack of local enthusiasm.

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Founded: 1823
Category: Statues in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Artbees (3 years ago)
Edinburgh Creative Network is a Scotland based marketing agency which provides intelligent, cost-effective bespoke software development solutions that are carefully built to the specific requirements of medium and large sized businesses.
Scott (3 years ago)
Excellent colleagues!!! Loved Edinburgh Creative Network working for such a wonderful company with comfortable environment and open for productive ideas. Diversity with the workplace was always a plus...
Alan Owen (3 years ago)
Not great! They forgot one person's food order, another person's egg was missing from a bacon and egg roll, beans and eggs were cold on the breakfasts and drinks arrived (with prompting) after some of us had finished eating. Drinks were nice but overall service was poor.
Andy Hitchings (3 years ago)
One of my favourite parts of Edinburgh - this is a must visit for anyone visiting the city. This is filled with cool, quirky and historic pubs and some really delicious food restaurants and bakery's. It has a real atmosphere to the place too.
Freya S (3 years ago)
A very busy place, think I would book next time, although we did not wait too long for a table. I love the breakfasts here and i must have been over 10 times now. The eggs with the add ons are the best part of the menu.
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