Monte d'Accoddi

Sassari, Italy

Monte d'Accoddi is a Neolithic archaeological site in northern Sardinia, located in the territory of Sassari. The site consists of a massive raised stone platform thought to have been an altar. It was constructed by the Ozieri culture or earlier, with the oldest parts dated to around 4,000–3,650 BC.

The site was discovered in 1954 in a field owned by the Segni family. No chambers or entrances to the mound have been found, leading to the presumption it was an altar, a temple or a step pyramid. It may have also served an observational function, as its square plan is coordinated with the cardinal points of the compass.

The initial Ozieri structure was abandoned or destroyed around 3000 BC, with traces of fire found in the archeological evidence. Around 2800 BC the remains of the original structure were completely covered with a layered mixture of earth and stone, and large blocks of limestone were then applied to establish a second platform, truncated by a step pyramid (36 m × 29 m, about 10 m in height), accessible by means of a second ramp, 42 m long, built over the older one. This second temple resembles contemporary Mesopotamian ziggurats, and is attributed to the Abealzu-Filigosa culture.

Archeological excavations from the chalcolithic Abealzu-Filigosa layers indicate the Monte d'Accoddi was used for animal sacrifice, with the remains of sheep, cattle, and swine recovered in near equal proportions. It is among the earliest known sacrificial sites in Western Europe.

The site appears to have been abandoned again around 1800 BC, at the onset of the Nuragic age.

The monument was partially reconstructed during the 1980s. It is open to the public and accessible by the old route of SS131 highway, near the hamlet of Ottava. It is 14,9 km from Sassari and 45 km from Alghero. There is no public transportation to the site. The opening times vary throughout the year.

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Sassari, Italy
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Details

Founded: 4000-3600 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ondrej Iván (17 months ago)
Interesting to see. But don’t expect the pyramids like in Egypt
olek sa (2 years ago)
Lack of information in English. You get a booklet in English but it's poorly marked. Worth a visit. Entry €4. It's very small maybe 15min including taking pic. Visit if its on your way.
Timotej Verbovšek (2 years ago)
One of the most fascinating places in Sardinia. In fact...in the world, as Monte d'Accoddi is listed as fourth oldest building in the world! (source: wiki) You do not need to go to Mesopotamia to see the zigurates...they are found in the heart of Europe. Indeed this is a very old and mystical site, so do not miss it.
Federica Merella (2 years ago)
A must see if you visit Sardinia. The first Ziqqurat dates back to ~ 5000 ( 3000 BC). You are not going to see anything like that in any other part of Europe. Our guide, Stefano Ligas was super, extremely knowledgeable and enthusiastic! Absolutely worth a visit.
Peter Van Der Meulen (3 years ago)
Amazing energy at the site. Ancient important place. Great for spiritual people.
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