Basilica di Saccargia

Codrongianos, Italy

The Basilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia is a church in the comune of Codrongianos, northern Sardinia. It is the most important Romanesque site in the island. The construction is entirely in local stone (black basalt and white limestone), with a typical appearance of Tuscan Romanesque style.

The church was finished in 1116 over the ruins of a pre-existing monastery, and consecrated on October 5 of the same year. Its construction was ordered by the giudice (judge) of Torres. It was entrusted to Camaldolese monks who here founded an abbey. It was later enlarged in Pisane style, including the addition of the tall bell tower. The portico on the façade is also probably a late addition, and is attributed to workers from Lucca.

The church was abandoned in the 16th century, until it was restored and reopened in the early 20th century.

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Founded: 1116
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas (2 years ago)
There could be more signs to give a bit of history of the church but it's quite beautiful and unique.
Andrew Tinsley (2 years ago)
If you are passing it's worth a visit
Suzanne Buckley (2 years ago)
Peaceful & amazing inside.
Serenella Speranza (2 years ago)
Unexpected and beautiful. Worth a trip just to see it
L K (2 years ago)
Real must If you're into 12th century peaceful, and a good bar nearby
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