Fountain of the Rosello

Sassari, Italy

The Fountain of the Rosello is a fountain in Sassari, considered the symbol of the city. It is located at the end of the Rosello valley next to the ancient district of the city.

It was built among 1603 and 1606 by Genoese craftsmen on the site of a preexisting source along the valley. To bring the water from the Rosello to the houses was a team of 300 water carrier that filled their barrels that loaded on the pack saddle of their donkeys.

The fountain was also used by the housekeepers to make the laundry of garments and laundry.

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    Address

    Corso Trinità, Sassari, Italy
    See all sites in Sassari

    Details

    Founded: 1603-1606
    Category:

    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    peppe kukka (13 months ago)
    In passing, I understand you often. Not only is it the sibule of the city, but it is also a monument of great cultural interest, aesthetically valuable. Sapid references to disputes between neighboring municipalities intertwine around it. And the public wash house, located next door, once assiduously frequented, was the place dedicated to the city's gossip; and it would be interesting to be able to be informed visitors. Today everything is abandoned, lush weeds multiply, a corner that appears forgotten. A shame, really, that no one has time to take care of the few maintenance works that could make the site usable, redeeming it from unjust oblivion!
    pts pts (14 months ago)
    Very very nice! Peaceful place
    Georges Younes (2 years ago)
    The fountain is easy to miss because it's oddly placed on the outskirts of the old city at the bottom of a hill, hidden from plain view. Look for it and make the effort of going down that hill, even if you don't feel like doing it. You will be rewarded with details that you can't otherwise see.
    Brad Deveson (2 years ago)
    I saw it on a Saturday afternoon about 5pm when it was open, free and even had a chap to explain things. Although overgrown, the path down to the fountain was obviously well made as the source was much used. To the left, closed off but visible through a crack in the fence, is the runoff off the fountain where people washed their clothes. The fountain itself is great with spurting lions and dolphins and some Latin if you're up for it.
    Giammario Ruiu (2 years ago)
    A+++
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