Alghero Cathedral

Alghero, Italy

Alghero was designated as a diocesan seat in 1503 but construction work on the cathedral did not begin until 1567. It was inaugurated in 1593 but was not finished. After several restorations it was consecrated in 1730.

The church was originally in Catalan-Gothic style, as can be seen in the five chapels and ambulatory of the presbytery, which also includes the octagonal base of the bell tower. The nave and the two aisles are however in Late Renaissance style. The main altar was designed by the Genovese artist Giuseppe Massetti (1727): the sculpture shows Mary the Immaculate flanked by angels. He also designed the ambulatory and the pulpit. In 1862 a Neo-Classical narthex was added to the façade, which dramatically changed its appearance.

The first chapel on the right side is dedicated to the Blessed Sacrament. Its imposing, marble altar was inaugurated in 1824. It is located inside a circular temple, reminding the Temple of Vesta in Rome.

The cathedral is the burial site of the Italian-born Duke of Montferrat (1762-1799) and his brother Count of Asti (1766-1802) who died on the island having caught malaria. The marble mausoleum was sculpted by Felice Festa in the early 19th century.

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Address

Via Roma 16, Alghero, Italy
See all sites in Alghero

Details

Founded: 1567
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alan Grogan (10 months ago)
Such a beautiful cathedral. It recently finished an 8 year long restoration. It has many fascinating objects, sculptures and paintings. My favourite was the two white marble lions at the front of the alter leading down to the main aisle.
Dennis Chapman (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful and awe inspiring cathedrals in Europe. Highly recommended to see for the original marble alter pieces. A must to see for world cathedral aficionados.
Georges Younes (2 years ago)
The cathedral of Alghero is small and hardly merits its appellation. It's still a place to visit when you are touring the old center of the city. Its location is ideal. The street in front is decorated with hanging birdcages. All the streets around have good shops and restaurants that will keep you busy for a couple of hours.
fabrizio pavan (2 years ago)
If you like historic building it's worth a visit.
Aila Jokiniemi (2 years ago)
Very many different places to see, nice city
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