Necropolis of Li Muri

Arzachena, Italy

The necropolis of Li Muri is an archaeological site located in the municipality of Arzachena. The necropolis, thought to be a product of the Arzachena culture and dating from the second half of the fourth millennium BC, is composed of five stone cists. Four of the cists are surrounded by stone circles that originally marked the limits of the mound of earth and rubble that was erected over the burial.

Bodies were interred inside the cists, probably individually (unlike in the rest of Sardinia where the graves were usually collective). The dead were accompanied by grave goods including pottery, stone vessels, hatchets and beads necklace of steatite and gemstones.

The architecture of the necropolis shows strong similarities with contemporary sites of Corsica, Provence and the Pyrenees.

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Details

Founded: 3500 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Americana Monki (3 years ago)
It's one of the oldest Necropolises on the planet, being over 6000 years old. Some people will find it amazing to breath the air of such place, others will just see a few boulders put in unusual pattern and wonder, why did they bother to go there at all.
Americana Monki (3 years ago)
It's one of the oldest Necropolises on the planet, being over 6000 years old. Some people will find it amazing to breath the air of such place, others will just see a few boulders put in unusual pattern and wonder, why did they bother to go there at all.
Agnes Zilinszki (3 years ago)
Just as the Tomba dei Giganti, it may seem to be just a pile of rocks, but knowing what you actually see, it is jaw-dropping, thousands of years old man made site. If you are in the area visit this site, and enjoy the scenery, while you're traveling. Unfortunately, the site was closed in March (or just on that particular day, we visited), but we luckily managed to see it anyway, just park on the side of the road, the site is right there, so you can easily see it.
Agi Zizi (3 years ago)
Just as the Tomba dei Giganti, it may seem to be just a pile of rocks, but knowing what you actually see, it is jaw-dropping, thousands of years old man made site. If you are in the area visit this site, and enjoy the scenery, while you're traveling. Unfortunately, the site was closed in March (or just on that particular day, we visited), but we luckily managed to see it anyway, just park on the side of the road, the site is right there, so you can easily see it.
Mirco Elissen (4 years ago)
Impressive that such old remains survived. Beeing used to old Roman and Greek artefact and old Dutch Hunnebedden the size of Li Muri is modest, also compared to the suggestion of the advertising photographs.
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