Giants' Grave of Coddu Vecchiu

Arzachena, Italy

Coddu Vecchiu is a Nuragic funerary monument located near Arzachena, dating from the Bronze Age. The site consists of a stele, stone megaliths and a gallery grave, and is one of the larger Nuragic Giants' graves on the island. The Nuraghe La Prisgiona is located nearby.

The site was excavated in 1966 by Editta Castaldi. Among the artifacts recovered were pans, bowls and plates with comb decoration, as well as vases with bent necks, and vase fragments of the early Nuragic Bonnanaro culture, suggesting the monument was constructed early in the Nuragic period c. 1800–1600 BC.

Coddu Vecchiu appears to have originally consisted of a cist, which was expanded during the middle Bronze Age c. 1800–1600 BC and covered with a gallery grave and the ornate stele portal stone and megaliths characteristic of Giants' graves. The stone forecourt consists of eleven granite stones arranged in a semicircle and measures about 12 meters across. It has been hypothesized that the semicircular arrangement of the stones may have been an attempt to harness the telluric current of the granite for rejuvenative purposes. The central stele stands about 4 meters high and contains the entrance into the tomb. The gallery grave extends behind the forecourt, measures about 10 meters long, and was probably once covered by a tumulus.

The upper portion of the stele was once taken by a local farmer and used as a plow, but it was soon recovered and restored to its place in the monument. Coddu Vecchiu is among the most well-preserved of Giants' graves, and continues to be a popular tourist attraction.

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Arzachena, Italy
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Details

Founded: 1800-1600 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Victoria Scott (2 years ago)
Absolutely breathtaking. A place that's so serene and peaceful. A wonderful example and reminder of the honouring of our ancestors. Magical and so real.
Douglas Rothstein (2 years ago)
Little to see, little is known about this place (although they don't hesitate to share what appears to be nearly baseless speculation), and yet they aren't shy to charge entrance even though little is done to earn a fee.
Francesco Perticarari (2 years ago)
You pay 4 euros to see 4 rocks you can already see perfectly from the access path and the main road. Absolutely NOT worth paying for it.
Mumu Thibz (2 years ago)
Very quick to visit but the site is nice and the person in charge is lovely and happy to explain everything.
Lena Ma (2 years ago)
Too expensive entrance to have 30min viewing. But interesting and professional woman at tge entrance speaking all languages
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