Pedres Castle

Olbia, Italy

Located at 89 meters in height, the Pedres castle was built between 1296 and 1322 during the Pisan-Aragonese domination period during the ascent of the Visconti family. It is characterized by two squares, one upper and one lower, surrounded by polygonal walls, reachable through stairs built with large granite boulders. Its position allowed to control the territory up to the Gulf of Olbia.

In 1339 the castle was entrusted to the hospital friars of Saint John of Jerusalem. From the second half of the fourteenth century it was occupied by the Aragonese and then by the Giudicato of Arborea. The castle met a definitive abandonment at the beginning of the fifteenth century, coinciding with the decline and depopulation of Civita.

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Details

Founded: 1296-1322
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Иванова в Италии (8 months ago)
Amazing view point!
Andrzej Starkman (10 months ago)
If u don't know what to do god for reset
Christophe Gevrey (10 months ago)
One of the rare point of interest in the region of Olbia. Good to spend 45 minutes to walk up the castle and see the big tombs nearby. Nothing exciting though.
Jamie Miscellaneous (2 years ago)
Nobody else around to get in the way. The tomb is a yawn but the Costello is awesome to climb with nice views from the top. Go careful though as the steps are made from rocks and uneven.
Jamie Miscellaneous (2 years ago)
Nobody else around to get in the way. The tomb is a yawn but the Costello is awesome to climb with nice views from the top. Go careful though as the steps are made from rocks and uneven.
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