San Tirso Church

Oviedo, Spain

The Church of Saint Thyrsus (Iglesia de San Tirso) was established in the 790s. Dedicated to Saint Thyrsus, it was built by Tioda, the royal architect of Alfonso II of Asturias. The Great Fire of Oviedo in 1521 and rebuilding in the 18th century removed most of the original church, except for a three-light window.

The building has suffered so much from alterations over the centuries and only the general plan has been preserved. It is that of a basilica with nave and aisles divided by rude stone piers set at unequal intervals, from which round arches spring. In the easternmost bay, however, owing to the smaller span, the arch was made sufficiently pointed to raise its crown to the same height as the others. This irregularity was already typical of Imperial Roman times, when barrel vaults were given a pointed form in order to make the height of rooms of varying size uniform, as it was necessary to raise the crown of the vault in some of them. This is illustrated by various chambers in the House of Tiberius on the Palatine.

There is no satisfactory explanation of the 'many angels' the building is said to have presented in the Codex Vigilianus.

In the rectangular sanctuary atriplet round-arched window 2 by 2 metres is preserved. With its pre-romanesque bases, rough brick arches, and capitals with rude packed leaves, it gives an idea of the better style of building and carving in the time of Alfonso II of Asturias. It is known that the church of San Tirso housed Royal Chapel.

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Details

Founded: 790s AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JONATHAN SANGUINO CARRIÓN (13 months ago)
Only the outer face of the south face remains original from the pre-Romanesque. Next to the Cathedral.
Maria Jose Mendez Diaz (15 months ago)
This downtown next to the cathedral keeps safe distances well
Ana Violeta Diaz González (16 months ago)
A beautiful Church, in the shadow of the Cathedral of Oviedo, for me it has a special meaning is my Parish where I received, until today, the Sacraments.
ANGEL Suarez (2 years ago)
Right in the center, next to the Cathedral is this building, the foundation of King Alfonso II el Casto in the 9th century. With numerous transformations and modifications, it was completely transformed at the end of the 12th century, in the Romanesque period, and in the 14th century, when a large part of the temple was rebuilt. Destroyed by fire in 1521, The last modification occurred during the 20th century. Of the primitive church, only the head wall of the head remains, the upper part being visible and the lower part being one meter below street level. Listed as a Site of Cultural Interest, a Historic-Artistic Monument since 1931.
ANGEL Suarez (2 years ago)
Right in the center, next to the Cathedral is this building, the foundation of King Alfonso II el Casto in the 9th century. With numerous transformations and modifications, it was completely transformed at the end of the 12th century, in the Romanesque period, and in the 14th century, when a large part of the temple was rebuilt. Destroyed by fire in 1521, The last modification occurred during the 20th century. Of the primitive church, only the head wall of the head remains, the upper part being visible and the lower part being one meter below street level. Listed as a Site of Cultural Interest, a Historic-Artistic Monument since 1931.
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