Cámara Santa

Oviedo, Spain

The Holy chamber of Oviedo (Cámara Santa de Oviedo) is a pre-Romanesque church built next to pre-romanesque Tower of San Miguel of the city's cathedral. Nowadays, the church occupies the angle between the south arm of the cathedral transept and a side of the cloister.

It was built during the 9th century as a palace chapel for King Alfonso II of Asturias and the church of San Salvador of Oviedo. Apart from acting as royal chapel, the Holy Chamber was built to house the jewels and relics of the cathedral of San Salvador in Oviedo, a function it continues to have 1200 years later. Some of these jewels were donated by the Kings Alfonso II and Alfonso III, and represent extraordinary gold artifacts of Asturian Pre-Romanesque, brought from Toledo after the fall of the Visigothic kingdom.

Consequently, the cathedral of Oviedo was also called Sancta Ovetensis; owing to quantity and quality of relics contained in the Cámara Santa. The Holy Chamber remains as the only sample of the early medieval complex. It was built as a relics' room to keep the different treasures associated with the Kingdom of Asturias (Cross of the Angels, Victory Cross, Agate box, Arca Santa and Sudarium of Oviedo), brought from Jerusalem to Africa, and after several translations was finally deposited at Oviedo by Alfonso II of Asturias.

It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in December 1998.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vladimir Titin (15 months ago)
Chapel of the 9th century heritage of humanity. It is located inside the cathedral of Oviedo. inside are the great pre-Romanesque treasures. Angels Cross, Victory Cross, Agates Box, the Holy Ark and the Holy Shroud.
jose manuel martinez garcia (15 months ago)
The one in public view is NOT the original, it is a replica
David Carretero (2 years ago)
Nice chamber, the oldest in the cathedral.
Francisco Urbano López García (2 years ago)
Precious, speechless
Fran Fernández (2 years ago)
Disappointing restoration and "Chinese bazaar" layout of relics. He has asked for the magic of the place
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