Cilgerran Castle (Welsh: Castell Cilgerran) is a 13th-century ruined castle located in Cilgerran, near Cardigan. The first castle on the site was thought to have been built by Gerald of Windsor around 1110–1115, and it changed hands several times over the following century between English and Welsh forces. In the hands of William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, the construction of the stone castle began after 1223.

After passing through successive families, it was left to ruin and eventually abandoned by 1400. The castle backs onto a cliff face, with the remaining ruins dating from the 13th century. It was most heavily fortified where it faces inland, and includes a pair of drum towers, rather than a central keep, which remain standing. It passed into the hands of the National Trust in 1938, who open it to the public.

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Founded: 1223
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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Mick (4 months ago)
Cilgerran Castle stands on a precipitous, craggy promontory overlooking the river Teifi where it merges with the Plysgog stream. The Teifi here is just at its tidal limit, so the castle was able to control both a natural crossing point and the passage of seagoing ships. We cannot be sure when this strong site was first fortified. First mentioned by name in 1108, a year later it was the suggested site for the abduction of Princess Nest, the spirited and beautiful wife of the Norman lord, Gerald of Windsor. Cilgerran was captured by the Lord Rhys in 1164 but was retaken by William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, in 1204, only to be taken again by the Welsh during Llywelyn the Great's campaigns in 1215. However, eight years later, William's son, another William, regained control, and it was probably he who built the imposing masonry castle we see today. The site changed hands many times after the Marshal family died out. It was ordered to be refortified in 1377 as a defence against the Welsh rebels who finally took of the site in 1405.
Nicola M (10 months ago)
Interesting
A (10 months ago)
Nice castle and nice views, unfortunately was closed to covid so only got to look through the gate and walk around, however there is a lovely walk along the local river if you follow the footpath signs from the main castle entrance
Robin Corney (12 months ago)
Went for a random drive as we was bored. Came across here last minute staff let us in for last 15 mins as we was NT members lovely castle ruins beautiful views from all angles and a lovely drive to get there. Well worth a visit
Dave Crisp (15 months ago)
Wonderful location and atmospheric well maintained ruin
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