The majority of the remaining St Mary's Church dates from the 15th century with some features retained from the 13th century. There is believed to have been a church on the site since Norman times, and Gerald of Wales is counted as the earliest Rector of Tenby.

The 13th century chancel has a 'wagon' roof and the panelled ceiling has 75 bosses carved in a variety of designs including foliage, grotesques, fishes, a mermaid, and a green man, as well as the figure of Jesus surrounded by the four Apostles. St. Thomas' Chapel was added in the mid-15th Century, and the St. Nicholas Chapel was added c. 1485. The spire is also a 15th-century addition. Inside the church is a 15th-century font and a 15th-century bell, cast with the letters Sancta Anna.

The tower is positioned to one side of the chancel and dates from the late 13th century. The first floor served as a chapel, and still has a stone altar and piscina in place.

The church has two fonts, one dating from the 15th century and another late Gothic example from the 19th century.

The church contains several memorials, including the tombs of Thomas and John White, both Mayors of Tenby in the fifteenth century. Thomas White was famous for hiding a young Henry Tudor from King Richard III.

In the churchyard, 20 metres west of the church, are the remains of what is believed to be a late 15th-century choir school or college. The wall includes a pointed arched doorway.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Rees (8 months ago)
Sunny Sunday morning with harmonious voices singing from within. Charming
Dan Bainbridge (9 months ago)
Very welcoming and friendly. High sung eucharist service. Lovely preach and prayers. Well worth a visit.
Mart W. (11 months ago)
Church with long history (brochures available inside in various languages, including Polish) with some really nice features and very pretty details inside. Nothing extra ordinary but still worth a visit
Stephen “The Badger Of Doom!” Chatfield (2 years ago)
A magnificent church in a very central location, stunning windows and plenty to explore. Plenty of parking nearby at a small cost.
Margaret Aveling (3 years ago)
Beautiful church with an amazing history. Thanks to the wonderful guide I came away knowing a lot about this building & its interior.
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