Tomb of Menecrates

Corfu, Greece

The Tomb of Menecrates is an Archaic-period cenotaph in Corfu, built around 600 BC in the ancient city of Korkyra. The tomb and the funerary sculpture of a lion were discovered in 1843 during demolition works by the British army who were demolishing a Venetian-era fortress in the site of Garitsa hill in Corfu. The tomb is dated to the sixth century BC.

The sculpture is dated to the end of the seventh century BC and is one of the earliest funerary lions ever found. The tomb and the sculpture were found in an area that was part of the necropolis of ancient Korkyra, which was discovered by the British army at the time. According to an Ancient Greek inscription found on the grave, the tomb was a monument built by the ancient Korkyreans in honour of their proxenos (ambassador) Menecrates, son of Tlasias, from Oiantheia. Menecrates was the ambassador of ancient Korkyra to Oiantheia (modern-day Galaxidi) or Ozolian Locris, and he was lost at sea, perhaps in a sea battle. The inscription also mentions that Praximenes, the brother of Menecrates, had arrived from Oiantheia to assist the people of Korkyra in building the monument to his brother.

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Kiprou 2, Corfu, Greece
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Details

Founded: 600 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Diogo Castro Silva (7 months ago)
Nice small remains of the past site.
Mark Vanautgaerden (8 months ago)
Here you can see the tomb of Menekrates, dating from the 7th up the mid 6th century B.C.! It was discovered in 1843... Unfortunately the site is now abandoned and left to decay with closed gates. Your can only have a look from the street from behind the fence. It has a lot of potential but as with so many archeological sites around Corfu town...
Markus “markobear1” (9 months ago)
Impressive. Small area but still impressive tomb of Menekrates uncovered in the 1800's . Interesting if you are a history buff and accessible views only over the protective fencing surrounding the church yard. The Tomb of Menecrates or Monument of Menecrates is an Archaic-period cenotaph in Corfu, Greece, built around 600 BC in the ancient city of Korkyra (or Corcyra).[1][2] The tomb and the funerary sculpture of a lion were discovered in 1843 during demolition works by the British army in the United States of the Ionian Islands who were demolishing a Venetian-era fortress in the site of Garitsa hill in Corfu.[3] The tomb is dated to the sixth century BC.[3] The sculpture is dated to the end of the seventh century BC and is one of the earliest funerary lions ever found.[3] The tomb and the sculpture were found in an area that was part of the necropolis of ancient Korkyra, which was discovered by the British army at the time.[3] According to an Ancient Greek inscription found on the grave, the tomb was a monument built by the ancient Korkyreans in honour of their proxenos (ambassador) Menecrates, son of Tlasias, from Oiantheia. Menecrates was the ambassador of ancient Korkyra to Oiantheia (modern-day Galaxidi) or Ozolian Locris,[4][5] and he was lost at sea,[6] perhaps in a sea battle.[7] The inscription also mentions that Praximenes, the brother of Menecrates, had arrived from Oiantheia to assist the people of Korkyra in building the monument to his brother.
ariadni theodosiadou (2 years ago)
The monument of Menekratis in Corfu It is a burial monument, a cenotaph in honor of Menekrates, consul of Corfu in Oianthia, a city near today's Galaxidi. It bears an inscription according to which the municipality, recognizing its work, erected the monument with the help of his brother Praximenis who came for this purpose from his homeland. The inscription in the Corinthian alphabet dates back to 600 BC. and is one of the oldest surviving Greek inscriptions. Respectively, the architectural type of the cenotaph is placed chronologically in 570/540 BC. and finds a unique parallel in Lindos of Rhodes, the cenotaph in honor of Cleobulus which has not been accurately dated. The monument was unveiled in 1843 during the British occupation of the island, during public works. It has since suffered significant damage due to its exposure and fragile material. It is a circular cenotaph that steps on a prominent base and consists of five structures of soft, yellowish, local porphyry according to the isodomic system. Its conical roof is not the original, but it must be similar to that. The monument is covered with stones in the form of radial tiling and ends at the top in a central rectangular plinth. The monument to Menekrat is located on the outskirts of the cemetery that developed during the archaic times in the north of the ancient city and extends outside the walls, opposite the gate of the port of Alkinoos. Its use continued during the Hellenistic period while it was limited during the Roman period. Signs were often placed on the tombs, simple or complex, which are often unique works of art. A unique example is the 'Lion of Menecrates' kept in the Archaeological Museum of Corfu and was named so as there was initially the impression that it was placed on the central rectangular plinth of the cenotaph of Menecrates.
Frank Wils (4 years ago)
Monument that impresses mostly by its age. The (empty) tomb is located next to a small street on a terrain that seems mostly (always?) closed. On the terrain are some descriptions but these can't be seen from the road. The tomb can be viewed pretty good, though. Worth a quick stop and let the fact sink in that this is over 2500 years old... Could be a better attraction with some effort.
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