Gjirokaster Fortress

Gjirokaster, Albania

Gjirokastër Castle dominates the town and overlooks the strategically important route along the river valley. It is open to visitors and contains a military museum featuring captured artillery and memorabilia of the Communist resistance against German occupation, as well as a captured United States Air Force plane to commemorate the Communist regime's struggle against the 'imperialist' western powers.

The citadel has existed in various forms since before the 12th century. The first of the defenses were put in place by the Despots of Epirus, an off-shoot of the Byzantine government, who established the basic towered structure of the castle. Extensive renovations and a westward addition was added by Ali Pasha of Tepelene after 1812. The government of King Zog expanded the castle prison in 1932.

Today it possesses five towers and houses, the new Gjirokastër Museum, a clock tower, a church, a cistern, the stage of the National Folk Festival, and many other points of interest.

The castle's prison was used extensively by Zog's government and housed political prisoners during the Communist regime.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yonathan Stein (6 months ago)
Amazing place to visit with arms museum inside. Costs 400 leke and close at 16 during winter. Best spot in the city for a panoramic view.
Анна Бабич (10 months ago)
Amazing, humongous castle, such an adventure just for 400 leke per person!!! A lot of ruins, ways to go explore, very beautiful view, landscape, you can take really cool photos. A bit dangerous though, but without it you can't feel the spirit of the place.
Veronika Kelbas (10 months ago)
Very interesting day trip within the city, castle and a lot of local delicious food
Ivan Bura (11 months ago)
UNESCO site for reason. Its one of places which you must see when you are in south Albania.
Леся (11 months ago)
Magnificent views!!!
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